Tag Archives: skepticism

Debunking Education Myths (Without Accidentally Reinforcing Them…)

Enduring education myths get in the way of student learning. Happily, we have concrete strategies to rebut those myths — without unintentionally making them seem more persuasive. Continue reading



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Sorting Hats, Myers-Briggs, and the Perils of False Classification

The Hidden Brain podcast on the dangers of false sorting reminds teachers about the dangers of Learning Styles Theory. Continue reading



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Pointing Out Online Mistakes Like a “Jerk”: More Misuses of Psychology Research

Despite the click-bait headlines, research doesn’t show much of anything surprising or consequential about people who correct your grammar online. Continue reading



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No, Brain Scans Can’t See You Think

https://npjscilearncommunity.nature.com/users/19663-tracey-tokuhama-espinosa/posts/42620-deciphering-fact-from-fiction-about-the-brain Continue reading



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Building a Better Research Mousetrap: @justsaysinmice

A new twitter account can help you sort the good science reporting from the bad. And, it’s got cute pictures too. Continue reading



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“Mindset Bull****,” “Gimmicks,” and Other Unhelpful Critiques

My friend Cindy Nebel has a thoughtful post about a recent article at TES. Here’s the backstory: a world-famous geneticist has dismissed research into Mindset as “bullshit” and “gimmicks.” Now, reasonable people have their doubts about Mindset Theory. We’ve written



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Is Your Classroom Worth More Than $10,000?

Here’s a remarkable story about potentially falsified research data. The short version: researchers James Heathers and Nick Brown thought that Nicolas Guéguen’s research findings were both too sexy and too tidy. Too sexy: Guéguen’s findings regularly made great headlines. For instance,



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Why Do Teachers Resist Research? And, Why Should We?

Let’s imagine that you show me research suggesting that students remember the words they draw better than the words they write down. After some thought…perhaps some experimentation on my own…I decide not to follow this research advice. Why did I



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Dodging “Dodgy” Research: Strategies to Get Past Bunk

If we’re going to rely on research to improve teaching — that’s why you’re here, yes? — we need to hone our skepticism skills. After all, we don’t want just any research. We want the good stuff. But, we face



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Choosing a Knowledge-Rich Curriculum: Pros and Cons

Should our curriculum focus on knowledge or skills? Jon Brunskill debates this question with himself in this thoughtful post. Brunskill does offer a strong conclusion in this debate. But just as important: the way he frames the discussion. Following Rapoport’s Rules



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