Tag Archives: skepticism

How Psychologists and Teachers Can Talk about Research Most Wisely

Dr. Neil Lewis thinks a lot about science communication: in fact, his appointment at Cornell is in both the Psychology AND the Communications departments. (For a complete bio, click here.) He and Dr. Jonathan Wai recently posted an article focusing on



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Laptop Notes or Handwritten Notes? Even the New York Times Has It Wrong [Reposted]

Which helps students learn more: handwritten notes, or laptop notes? The best-known research on the subject might surprise you… Continue reading



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The Limits of “Desirable Difficulties”: Catching Up with Sans Forgetica

Can a hard-to-read font improve student learning? That’s a very strange question, but in 2019 we had some reasons to think the answer was “yes.” Just published research updates our understanding. Continue reading



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Unbearable Irony: When Dunning-Kruger Bites Back…

People who don’t know much about a topic typically overestimate their expertise. We call this the Dunning-Kruger Effect. So: what happens when someone who doesn’t know much about the Dunning-Kruger Effect tries to explain it? Brace yourself for an excess of irony. Continue reading



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Training in Effective Skepticism: Retraction Watch

You’re looking for a new source for effective skepticism. Look no further. Continue reading



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A Fresh Approach to Evaluating Working Memory Training

A new method for evaluating working memory training raises an intriguing possibility: despite all our skepticism, might that training work after all? Continue reading



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Whose Online Teaching Advice Do You Trust?

Paradoxically, the right amount of self-doubt should inspire in readers a greater sense of trust. Continue reading



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Starting the Year Just Right: Healthy Skepticism

Adults prefer natural settings to urban ones. We can easily imagine an evolutionary explanation for that preference. But: do children share it? Continue reading



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A Holiday Present for the Teacher/Skeptic (in Beta)

A new website helps us confirm — or disconfirm — research findings that (perhaps) ought to guide our teaching. Continue reading



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Today’s Neuro-Nonsense: Reading Brainwaves in the Classroom

Live EEGs in the classroom just don’t work this way. Continue reading



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