Tag Archives: skepticism

Just Not a Useful Debate: Learning Styles Theory

At one of the first Learning and the Brain conferences I attended, a speaker briefly mentioned that learning styles theory doesn’t have much good evidence to support it. That comment turned into a heated debate. Several attendees asked vexed, unhappy



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3rd Graders Beware! The Perils of Mindfulness Research

Despite suggestive research about its benefits, teachers should know the perils of mindfulness research. In this study, for example, yoga might have helped 3rd graders improve their emotional quality of life…but the study lacks an active control group. We can hope that the mindfulness helped, but we can’t be sure. Continue reading



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Can You Resist the Seductive Allure of Neuroscience?

The seductive allure of neuroscience often blinds us. In fact, the image on the right shows the part of the brain — the focal geniculative nucleus — that lights up when we’re taken in by false neuroscience information. Ok, no



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Training Working Memory: Bad News, and Surprising Great News

Training working memory might be effective not because it increases WM, but because it gives participants a chance to figure out a successful strategy. If so, we can give students the same boost simply by telling them that strategy… Continue reading



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The Mindset Controversy: Is It Time to Give Up?

Few theories have gotten more teacherly attention than Carol Dweck’s work on Mindset. As you no doubt know, she has found that a “fixed mindset” (the belief that ability and intelligence can’t really change) demotivates people. On the other hand,



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Sleeplessness Harms Women’s Thinking More Than Men’s?

You can understand why this study lit up my twitter feed recently. It makes a remarkable claim: women — but not men — experience working memory declines after a sleepless night. Why We Care We have at least two powerful



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You Are Not a Nile Grass Rat…

Teachers should pay close attention to neuroscience and psychology research done on people. However, you should NEVER change your teaching practice based on research into non-human animals. Continue reading



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Surprise! Less Oxytocin Might Improve Social Interaction

A potential downside to oxytocin: it might harm social interactions. This specific research finding offers teachers a general reminder: be skeptical of simplistic teaching advice based on hormones. Continue reading



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Don’t Be Fooled by the Learning Pyramid Myth

The problem with the pyramid is not merely that it’s inaccurate, but that it’s incoherent.
The important lesson here goes beyond “always check the sources.” Instead, the point is “always check specific claims.”
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Foolish “Brain Training” Flim-Flam of the Day

Tom Brady’s new “Brain Training” Website looks a lot like earlier attempts to over-hype thinly supported brain research. Don’t fall for it. Continue reading



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