Tag Archives: neuroscience

The Best-Known Neural Model of Learning Might be Substantially Wrong

A new neural model of long-term memory formation might change our understanding of learning. It should not, however, change our approaches to teaching. Continue reading



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STOP THE PRESSES (And Yet, Remain Calm)

In the world of science, if you see the right kind of evidence, you have to change your mind. As of this blog post, I might start changing my mind. Regular readers know that I frequently decry false claims about



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Working Memory Overload Throws Neurons Out of Synch

Students use working memory all day long, but they — and we — don’t have very much. New research is starting to explain what happens when they experience working memory overload. In brief: brain regions that must function synchronously stop doing so. Some day this research field might help our students learn more effectively. Continue reading



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The Limitations of Neuroscience in Guiding Teachers

Neuroscience offers fascinating insights into brains; psychology provides specific teaching suggestions. However much we enjoy and learn from the former, we should keep our eye on the latter. (Helpful links provided.) Continue reading



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Spiders in Budapest: Deeper Understanding of the Brain

“Why can I forget what the capital of Hungary is, but not that I’m afraid of spiders?” Michael S. C. Thomas kicks off his website “How The Brain Works” with this intriguing question. Dr. Thomas is a good person to



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Brain Research in Translation

Science relies on skepticism, so let’s ask a skeptical question: “Does it really benefit teachers to understand brain research? Isn’t good teaching good teaching?” If you’re reading this blog, you doubtless already see the value that brain research offers teachers.



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“We Can No Longer Ignore Evidence about Human Development”

The more teachers learn about neuroscience and psychology, the more we admire Dr. Mary Helen Immordino-Yang. Unlike most researchers, she has spent time as a classroom teacher. And, her extensive research—in both neuroscience and psychology—offers us wise perspectives on our



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Why Do Choices Interfere with Your Learning?

At times, choices might help motivate students. However, at other times, choices harm learning. When we distinguish between the two, we help our students. Continue reading



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This Is Your Amygdala on a Cliff…

If you’ve seen the documentary Free Solo, you know about Alex Honnold’s extraordinary attempt to climb a 3000 foot sheer rock face. Without ropes. Without protective gear of any kind. And without, it seems, a typically functioning amygdala. Free Solo briefly



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Life Without Memory: Your Hippocampus and You

Who are you without your memory? In neurobiological lingo: who are you without your hippocampus? The Best-Known Answer No doubt you’ve heard of Henry Molaison, aka H. M., whose hippocampi were removed in order to cure debilitating epilepsy. The good



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