Tag Archives: sleep

Unambiguously Good News about Teens and Sleep

You read that right. I mean: it’s really good news about teens and sleep. We all want adolescents to sleep more. Better said, we know that they need to sleep more. More sleep should benefit, say, their mental health, their physical



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Everything You Wanted to Know About Sleep, in 20 Minutes

Russell Foster is on the case…



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10,000 People Talk About Sleep and Cognition

Most of the research studies I read include a few tens of people. Sixty or eighty is good; more than 100 is rare. I’ve seen published studies with an even dozen. So when I hear about a study with over



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Solving the Nap Research Problem (BTW: Naps Help!)

New research from China shows that daytime naps improve several cognitive functions — like sustained attention. Just as important, those naps don’t make it harder to sleep at night. In fact: frequent nappers sleep better than non-nappers. So, grab a pillow! Continue reading



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Chronotype Influences Grades. Owls Are Sad…

Sleep researchers distinguish between morning “larks” and night “owls.” These chronotypes influence grades, because school schedules favor morning larks over night owls. If we want to help all our students learn, we should create schedules that work for as many of them as possible. Continue reading



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“Not Just a Decadent Luxury”: The Power of Naps

We know that sleep is good for learning. But what about NAPS? Over at BrainBlogger, Viatcheslav Wlassoff summarizes research suggesting that naps yield clear benefits for cognition, attention, and emotion. Although I find research into the power of naps generally persuasive,



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Sleeplessness Harms Women’s Thinking More Than Men’s?

You can understand why this study lit up my twitter feed recently. It makes a remarkable claim: women — but not men — experience working memory declines after a sleepless night. Why We Care We have at least two powerful



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An Extra Half-Hour of Sleep? An Extra Hour?

Students whose first class started later than 8:30 got between 27 and 57 (!) more minutes of sleep than students whose classes started earlier. Imagine just how much more learning might happen if a teen regularly got an extra hour of sleep. Continue reading



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Bright Screens and Sleep

Here’s a handy review of the effects that bright computer and tablet screens have on sleep. (Hint: they’re not helping.) Author Viatcheslav Wlassoff concludes with a few simple hints on how to reduce the detrimental effects of screens on melatonin.



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Parents, High School Start Times, and Sleepy Teens

Research findings that support later high-school start times have been more and more common in recent years. (See also here.) And teachers I know are increasingly vocal about letting teens sleep later. And yet, when I talk with high school



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