Tag Archives: working memory

STOP THE PRESSES (And Yet, Remain Calm)

In the world of science, if you see the right kind of evidence, you have to change your mind. As of this blog post, I might start changing my mind. Regular readers know that I frequently decry false claims about



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Working Memory Overload Throws Neurons Out of Synch

Students use working memory all day long, but they — and we — don’t have very much. New research is starting to explain what happens when they experience working memory overload. In brief: brain regions that must function synchronously stop doing so. Some day this research field might help our students learn more effectively. Continue reading



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A Handy Summary of Memory Definitions, for Teachers and Students

Here‘s a quick summary of information about memory: sensory memory, working memory, long-term memory, and (crucially!) forgetting. Author Steven Turner presents this brisk overview to combat “buzzword wasteland.” He fears the education-world habit of coming up with fancy new terms



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Taking Notes with Graphic Organizers

Researchers office us concrete advice on the best form for handwritten notes: outlines vs. graphic organizers; incomplete vs. complete. Continue reading



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Do Collaborative Projects Reduce or Increase Working Memory Stress?

Should teachers ask students to work on projects in teams? This question generates a great deal of heat. Many education thinkers advocate for the benefits of teamwork. Others insist that learning happens one brain at a time, and so should



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Praising Researchers, Despite Our Disagreements

This blog often critiques the hype around “brain training.” Whether Lumosity or Tom Brady‘s “brain speed” promises, we’ve seen time and again that they just don’t hold water. Although I stand behind these critiques, I do want to pause and



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Can Teachers Be Trusted to Evaluate Research?

Too often, teachers hear that our judgment about classroom applications of scientific research isn’t to be trusted. And yet, teacher judgment is essential when applying research in the classroom. Given that psychology research affects classroom practice only when teachers use it, why put down the teachers who are essential partners in this process? Our field should focus not on competition, but on respectful collaboration. Continue reading



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Fool Me Twice, Shame on Me

We often post about the unreliability of “brain training.” Heck, even though I live in Boston and am a Patriots fan, I made fun of Tom Brady’s website claiming to “increase brain speed” and other such nonsense. (I don’t even



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10,000 People Talk About Sleep and Cognition

Most of the research studies I read include a few tens of people. Sixty or eighty is good; more than 100 is rare. I’ve seen published studies with an even dozen. So when I hear about a study with over



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Does Media Multitasking Really Interfere with Student Thinking?

To many teachers, it just seems obvious: all that screen times MUST be bad for student brains. To many other teachers, it just seems obvious: technology will unleash academic possibilities and revolutionize education. So, which is it? Does media multitasking



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