Tag Archives: adolescence

“We Can No Longer Ignore Evidence about Human Development”

The more teachers learn about neuroscience and psychology, the more we admire Dr. Mary Helen Immordino-Yang. Unlike most researchers, she has spent time as a classroom teacher. And, her extensive research—in both neuroscience and psychology—offers us wise perspectives on our



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Surprise: The Adolescent Brain Isn’t Broken

Chapter 2 of Inventing Ourselves: The Secret Life of the Teenage Brain kicks off with a teenager’s diary entry from April of 1969: I went to arts centre (by myself!) in yellow cords and blouse. Ian was there but he



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Teenagers, Hormones, and Other Stubborn Myths

There’s a short video about adolescence making the rounds on social media. The video offers a quick explanation for highly-emotional teenage behavior. And it has a suggestion or two for parents. The suggestions themselves make good sense: Reassure your child



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Attack of the Teenage Brain!: Understanding and Supporting the Weird and Wonderful Adolescent Learner by John Medina

John Medina, developmental molecular biologist and New York Times best-selling author, has written a book about how to parent and teach teenagers in light of what we know about adolescent social, cognitive, and neural development.  In Attack of the Teenage



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A Hidden Adolescent Struggle: Identifying Complex Emotions

Recent research offers a helpful insight into adolescent emotion processing. Children and adults are relatively good at distinguishing among their emotions. They can say “I’m feeling angry, but not sad.” Adolescents, however, have a harder time sorting out their feelings. For them, negative emotions all churn together. Continue reading



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Adolescents and Self-Control: Do Teens Recognize High Stakes?

Why is adolescent self-control so difficult? Recent research suggests that teens don’t consistently recognize the difference between high-stakes and low-stakes situations. And: the brain networks that help them do so don’t mature until we turn 19 or 20. Continue reading



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