Tag Archives: parents

When Parents Teach Reading, Do They Also Promote Math Skills?

New research from England gives parents insight into the relationship between learning to read and learning to count. Continue reading



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parenting teens

Big Hairy Audacious Education Proposal of the Month

John Medina’s books have been a gateway drug for many a brain-focused teacher. (Like so many others, I myself was introduced to the field by his book Brain Rules.) His most recent book, Attack of the Teenage Brain!, joins a



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monitoring screen time

Strategies that Backfire: Monitoring Screen Time

Paradoxically, monitoring screen time for young children increases their screen usage. A better strategy: modeling the behavior we want to see. Continue reading



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preschool for parents

Preschool for Parents: Surprising Long-Term Benefits

Head Start programs prepare young children — especially those from lower socio-economic cohorts — for success in school. Can these programs help more if extended by the parents? Continue reading



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mother's homework help

Should Mothers Help Children With Homework?

According to a new study in Finland, a mother’s homework help might reduce her child’s feelings of autonomy and competence. For this reason, even well-intentioned help might reduce a child’s motivation–at least in 2nd and 3rd grades. Continue reading



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motivation vs. IQ

Motivation vs. IQ: Which Is More Important?

In the “motivation vs. IQ” debate, the Gottfrieds’ research suggests that intrinsic love of learning sets students on a path to lifetime fulfillment. And, parents can help them get there by encouraging curiosity. Continue reading



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deployment hinders learning

Military Parents Serving Overseas: What Happens To The Children?

A parent’s absence because of deployment does affect their children’s learning. Specifically, deployment itself brings down standardized test scores 0.42%; each additional month prompts and additional 0.11% reduction. The averages are slightly higher in math and science, and lower in reading in social sciences and reading. Continue reading



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Head Start: Right on Time

“Children who grow up in poverty often exhibit delays in academic and social-emotional school readiness that undermine their school progress at kindergarten entry and initiate a lifelong trajectory of underachievement and underemployment.”   What a powerful concept — a lifelong



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Parenting Matters, and Earlier than You Think

Studies of neglect and maltreatment of young children have revealed a lot about early brain development (e.g., Cicchetti, 2002; Nelson, 2000). These studies have highlighted that experiences in the first years of life can have profound implications across the lifespan.



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Parent-Child Interactions: Forming Beliefs About Intelligence

It is common knowledge that parents play a vital role in their children’s development. However, we are slowly coming to understand just how vital this role is. Teachers understand this connection better than anyone; we interact with our students’ parents,



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