Tag Archives: long-term memory

Two New Ways of Thinking About Memory

In our classroom work, we teachers focus on learning; in their research, psychologists and neuroscientists often focus on memory. We have, in other words, different frameworks for talking about the same topic. When I find one review article that provides TWO fresh ways



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“How to Study Less and Learn More”: Explaining Learning Strategies to our Students

Because cognitive science gives us such good guidance about learning, we want to share that information with our students. “Study THIS WAY!” we cry. “Research says so!” Alas, all too often, students don’t follow our advice. A key part of



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Music and Memory: A Learning Strategy?

We know that sleep is good for learning. Is there anything we can do to make it EXTRA good? Perhaps, used strategically, music might hold the key. Continue reading



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Dangerous Fluency: Performance Isn’t Always Learning

Cognitive science research helps teachers understand learning better than our students do. We should be confident in offering wise counsel. For instance: based on research, should be ban technology from classrooms? Continue reading



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More about Macbeth and Memory

Earlier this month, I wrote about the distinction between autobiographical memory and semantic memory. Both kinds help us live meaningful lives. But, schools focus on semantic memory: we want our students to know facts and skills over the long term.



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Getting the Timing Right: Critical Thinking Online

Spacing practice out helps students learn all sorts of things. Can it help them learn to be critical thinkers online? Continue reading



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Tea and Macbeth: Autobiographical vs. Semantic Memory

Dramatic classroom events are memorable, but they’re the wrong kind of memorable if we want students to learn the underlying concepts. Clare Sealy explains why. Continue reading



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Faster Learners Remember Better (Perhaps)

Adults who learned word pairs faster also remembered them better the following day. How does this research apply to schools? For lots of reasons, we just don’t yet know… Continue reading



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When Facing Dramatic Blog Headlines, Ask For Evidence

A recent blog claims that “exams damage teens’ mental health.” Before you accept that claim, you should check out its evidence… Continue reading



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But Does It Work In The Classroom? (A Hint: YES!)

A large study in five different Florida schools gives us lots of confidence that “interleaving” — mixing up different kinds of practice problems together — helps students learn. This technique takes a little extra time, but it’s highly effective and it’s free. Continue reading



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