Tag Archives: long-term memory

Little boy blowing golf ball into hole.

Is Teaching Golf Like Teaching Algebra?

My work in this field starts with a simple logical argument: A: Learning happens in…



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What (and Why) Should Students Memorize? Confidence and Fluency for...

In our profession,┬ámemorization has gotten a bad name. The word conjures up alarming images: Dickensian…



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Two New Ways of Thinking About Memory

In our classroom work, we teachers focus on┬álearning; in their research, psychologists and neuroscientists often…



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“How to Study Less and Learn More”: Explaining Learning Strategies...

Because cognitive science gives us such good guidance about learning, we want to share that…



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Music and Memory: A Learning Strategy?

We know that sleep is good for learning. Is there anything we can do to make it EXTRA good? Perhaps, used strategically, music might hold the key. Continue reading



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Dangerous Fluency: Performance Isn’t Always Learning

Cognitive science research helps teachers understand learning better than our students do. We should be confident in offering wise counsel. For instance: based on research, should be ban technology from classrooms? Continue reading



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More about Macbeth and Memory

Earlier this month, I wrote about the distinction between autobiographical memory and semantic memory. Both…



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Getting the Timing Right: Critical Thinking Online

Spacing practice out helps students learn all sorts of things. Can it help them learn to be critical thinkers online? Continue reading



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Tea and Macbeth: Autobiographical vs. Semantic Memory

Dramatic classroom events are memorable, but they’re the wrong kind of memorable if we want students to learn the underlying concepts. Clare Sealy explains why. Continue reading



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Faster Learners Remember Better (Perhaps)

Adults who learned word pairs faster also remembered them better the following day. How does this research apply to schools? For lots of reasons, we just don’t yet know… Continue reading



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