Tag Archives: retrieval practice

Study Advice for Students: Getting the Specifics Just Right

To get the best benefits from “retrieval practice,” teachers can try this strategy to reassure and motivate nervous students. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

The Best Teaching Book to Read This Summer: Powerful Teaching

Powerful Teaching, by Agarwal and Bain, combines research and practical classroom strategies. The result: an ideal book for teachers who want to improve our practice. Continue reading



Posted in Book Reviews, L&B Blog | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

A Rose by Any Other Name Would Smell as Confusing

All too often, psychology discussions use confusing — or worse, deliberately cheerful — terminology. Teachers should seek out direct and neutral terms to simplify and clarify our discussions. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Meet Blake Harvard, “Effortful Educator”

An interview with Blake Harvard: high-school psychology teacher, and Effortful Educator. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

The Better Choice: Open- or Closed-Book Quizzes

As predicted by research into “retrieval practice,” closed-book quizzes do in fact help students learn better than open-book quizzes do. Once again, the right kind of difficulties can be desirable in school. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Can Teachers Be Trusted to Evaluate Research?

Too often, teachers hear that our judgment about classroom applications of scientific research isn’t to be trusted. And yet, teacher judgment is essential when applying research in the classroom. Given that psychology research affects classroom practice only when teachers use it, why put down the teachers who are essential partners in this process? Our field should focus not on competition, but on respectful collaboration. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Good News! Contradictory Research on Desirable Difficulties…

As we regularly emphasize here on the blog, attempts to recall information benefit learning. That is: students might study by reviewing material. Or, they might study with practice tests. (Or flashcards. Perhaps Quizlet.) Researchers call this technique “retrieval practice,” and



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

The Limits of Retrieval Practice, Take II…

Just two weeks ago, I posted about a study showing potential boundary conditions for retrieval practice: one of the most robustly supported classroom strategies for enhancing long-term memories. As luck would have it, the authors of that study wrote up their



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

The Limits of Retrieval Practice: A Helpful Case Study

Here on the blog, I write A LOT about the benefits of “retrieval practice.” (For example: here and here.) In brief: our students often review by trying to put information into their brains. That is: they “go over” the material. However,



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Let’s Get Practical: When Should Students Self-Test?

When should students self-test for maximum learning? Recent research suggests that retrieval practice timing matters less than retrieval practice doing. That is: students can self test at the end of a textbook section, or an the end of a chapter; both techniques help them learn. For even better memories, do both! Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged | Leave a comment