Tag Archives: classroom advice

Daring to Flip the Public Health Classroom

“Flipping the classroom” has been around long enough now to have its own Wikipedia page. Proponents suggest that this strategy allows teachers to focus less on direct instruction and more on collaboration, problem solving, and application. Critics respond that direct



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Vital Resources in Psychology: the Best Research for Teachers

These vital resources in psychology research can help teachers find the most effective teaching practices. They also provide lively examples of researchers doing what they do best: exploring complex questions with imagination and humility. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Don’t “Ignore the Man Behind the Curtain”

If you’ve got a question about the study you just read — for example, how best to make it work in your classroom — you just might reach out to the study’s author. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged | Leave a comment

Training Working Memory: Bad News, and Surprising Great News

Training working memory might be effective not because it increases WM, but because it gives participants a chance to figure out a successful strategy. If so, we can give students the same boost simply by telling them that strategy… Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Can You Reduce Stress by Writing About Failure?

The method sounds counter-intuitive, but it works: we can reduce stress by writing about failure. Recent research shows that students who wrote about previous struggle responded more calmly to a stressful situation, and did better on a subsequent attention test. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Adolescents and Self-Control: Do Teens Recognize High Stakes?

Why is adolescent self-control so difficult? Recent research suggests that teens don’t consistently recognize the difference between high-stakes and low-stakes situations. And: the brain networks that help them do so don’t mature until we turn 19 or 20. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Point/Counterpoint: Escaping the Inquiry Learning Debate

In the absence of consistent research findings, assessing Inquiry Learning can be a challenge. Teachers should rely on basic cognitive variables — like working memory and attention — to reach conclusions about its usefulness. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Despite the Skeptics, a Champion of Direct Instruction

In the debates between “progressive” and “traditional” educational theories, few arguments rage hotter than the battle between project based learning and direct instruction. PBL’s proponents take a constructivist perspective. They argue that people learn by building their own meaning from



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged | 2 Comments

Surprise! The Unexpected Outdoor Class Advantage

But do your students have a point? Might there be good reasons to move class outside every now and then? Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Getting the Best Advice about Learning

Occasionally I try to persuade people that neuroscience is fantastically complicated. In other words: we shouldn’t beat ourselves up if we don’t master it all. Today I spotted a headline that makes my point for me:   Hippocampus-driven feed-forward inhibition



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , , | Leave a comment