Tag Archives: classroom advice

Design Thinking: How Does It Work In The Classroom?

A careful study of design thinking finds modest successes — especially for students who have struggled in school. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged | Leave a comment

“But I Study Much Better With My Music On”

Yet another study shows that background music — especially music with lyrics — makes reading comprehension harder, not easier. We study best in silence. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Overcoming Potential Perils of Online Learning

Typical at-home distractions can indeed interfere with online learning. Happily, researchers have suggestions on how best to mitigate these problems. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Handshakes at the Door: Hype, or Helpful?

It’s not just cute videos! Research also shows that greeting individual students at the classroom door leads to higher levels of attention and fewer classroom disruptions. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Constructivism: In The Brain, In The Classroom

Is constructivism a theory of learning, or a theory of teaching? Mike Hobbiss offers a provocative answer. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

But Does It Work In The Classroom? (A Hint: YES!)

A large study in five different Florida schools gives us lots of confidence that “interleaving” — mixing up different kinds of practice problems together — helps students learn. This technique takes a little extra time, but it’s highly effective and it’s free. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

[A Specific] Movement Helped [Specific] Students Learn [A Specific] Thing

Research shows that movement can help kindergarteners understand the number line — an essential concept for math learning in general. We should not assume therefore that movement always benefits learning. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Not All of Us Work Effectively in a “Memory Palace”

Students with lower visuospatial aptitude don’t benefit much from “memory palaces.” This research finding leads to important classroom strategies…and to bigger questions as well. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

The Best Teaching Book to Read This Summer: Powerful Teaching

Powerful Teaching, by Agarwal and Bain, combines research and practical classroom strategies. The result: an ideal book for teachers who want to improve our practice. Continue reading



Posted in Book Reviews, L&B Blog | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Visual & Verbal: Welcome to “Dual Coding”

By “dual coding” — that is, by presenting information both verbally and visually — we can reduce our students working memory load. And: we can help them learn. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment