Tag Archives: classroom advice

When Good Classroom Assignments Go Bad

Classroom assignments often sound like great ideas, until they crash into working memory limitations. Happily, we’ve got the strategies to solve this kind of problem. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Can Multiple-Choice Tests Really Help Students?

Surprise: a well-designed multiple choice question might in fact help students. Why? Because it requires extra retrieval practice to sort out all the answers. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

More about Macbeth and Memory

Earlier this month, I wrote about the distinction between autobiographical memory and semantic memory. Both kinds help us live meaningful lives. But, schools focus on semantic memory: we want our students to know facts and skills over the long term.



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Getting the Timing Right: Critical Thinking Online

Spacing practice out helps students learn all sorts of things. Can it help them learn to be critical thinkers online? Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Fostering Curiosity in the Classroom: “What Percentage of Animals are Insects?”

When we ask students to predict the answers to questions, we make them more curious about those answers. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Tea and Macbeth: Autobiographical vs. Semantic Memory

Dramatic classroom events are memorable, but they’re the wrong kind of memorable if we want students to learn the underlying concepts. Clare Sealy explains why. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Inquiry- and Problem-Based Pedagogy: Dramatic Results in South America (?)

This study conclusively shows that good teaching is more effective than bad teaching. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Prior Knowledge: Building the Right Floor

Researchers can demonstrate that some core knowledge is essential for students to start learning about a topic. Teachers can use that guidance to improve learning for all students. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Advice: It Is Better to Give than Receive

Students benefit not only from receiving advice, but also from giving it. This low cost strategy can build confidence and promote learning. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Study Advice for Students: Getting the Specifics Just Right

To get the best benefits from “retrieval practice,” teachers can try this strategy to reassure and motivate nervous students. Continue reading



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | 2 Comments