Tag Archives: classroom advice

“Rich” or “Bland”: Which Diagrams Helps Students Learn Deeply?

Colorful diagrams might raise students’ interest. What do those diagrams do for their learning? Continue reading



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“Before You Change Your Teaching, Change Your Thinking”

When I attended my first Learning and the Brain conference, more than a decade ago, I had a simple plan: Step 1: Listen to the researcher’s advice. Step 2: Do what the researcher told me to do. Step 3: Watch



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“Successive Relearning”: 1 + 1 = +10%

We know that “retrieval practice” helps students learn. We know that “spacing” does too. What happens when we combine those techniques? Continue reading



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Laptop Notes or Handwritten Notes? Even the New York Times Has It Wrong [Reposted]

Which helps students learn more: handwritten notes, or laptop notes? The best-known research on the subject might surprise you… Continue reading



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“How to Study Less and Learn More”: Explaining Learning Strategies to our Students

Because cognitive science gives us such good guidance about learning, we want to share that information with our students. “Study THIS WAY!” we cry. “Research says so!” Alas, all too often, students don’t follow our advice. A key part of



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The Limits of “Desirable Difficulties”: Catching Up with Sans Forgetica

Can a hard-to-read font improve student learning? That’s a very strange question, but in 2019 we had some reasons to think the answer was “yes.” Just published research updates our understanding. Continue reading



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“Doing Science” or “Being a Scientist”: What Words Motivate Students?

If teachers could boost students’ motivation — even slightly — by changing our language, would that effort be worth the time? Continue reading



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“Seductive Details”: When Do Cool Stories and Videos Interfere with Learning?

When teachers include cool stories and funny videos in our lessons, does that ultimately help our students learn? A recent meta-analysis crunches the numbers. Continue reading



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Beyond “Tricks-n-Tips”: What does Cog Sci Tell Us About Online Learning?

When it comes to online learning, don’t just “do this thing.” Instead, “think this way.” Continue reading



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Beyond the Mouse: Pointing in Online Learning [Repost]

As teachers across the country prepare to move our work online, I’ve been looking over previous posts that might offer practical guidance. This post — from July of last year — asks a simple question: in online teaching, does pointing matter? Happily,



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