Tag Archives: classroom advice

There’s No Polite Way to Say “I Told You So”

Back in 2014, Pam Mueller and Dan Oppenheimer made headlines with their wittily titled study “The Pen Is Mightier Than The Keyboard.” In that study, they found that students learn more from taking handwritten notes during a lecture than from



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Two Helpful Strategies to Lessen Exam Stresses

Exam stress bothers many of our students. Sadly, it hinders students from lower socio-economic status (SES) families even more. As a result, these students struggle — especially in STEM classes. And, this struggle makes it harder for them to enter



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Does Drawing a Simple Picture Benefit Memory?

If a picture is worth 1000 words, how many words is drawing a picture worth? More specifically, Jeffrey Wammes & Co. have been exploring this question: is it true that drawing benefits memory? If I draw a picture of a



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Research Summary: The Best and Worst Highlighting Strategies

Does highlighting help students learn? As is so often the case, the answer is: it depends. The right kind of highlighting can help. But, the wrong kind doesn’t help. (And, might hurt.) And, most students do the wrong kind. Today’s



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

New Research: Personal Best Goals (Might) Boost Learning

Some research-based suggestions for teaching require a lot of complex changes. (If you want to develop an interleaved syllabus, you’re going to need some time.) Others couldn’t be simpler to adopt. Here’s a suggestion from researchers Down Under: encourage your



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Bit by Bit, Putting It Together

Over at Teacherhead, Tom Sherrington has posted a form that teachers can use for lesson plans. He has put together different versions: one filled-in with explanations, another left blank for teachers to use, yet another for adapting and editing. The Bigger



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged | Leave a comment

New Year, New Habits: More Learning!

When the school year starts back up in January, teachers would LOVE to use this fresh start for good. In particular, our students might have developed some counter-productive habits during the first half of the year. Wouldn’t it be great



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Escaping the “Inquiry vs. Direct Instruction” Debate

If you’d like to stir up a feisty argument at your next faculty meeting, lob out a casual observation about direct instruction. Almost certainly, you’ll hear impassioned champions (“only direct instruction leads to comprehension”) and detractors (“students must construct their



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

When Multitasking Helps (And Why Teachers Should Discourage It Anyway)

We all know that multitasking is baaaaad. In fact, we all know that multitasking doesn’t happen. Instead, when we think we’re multitasking, we’re actually switching rapidly back and forth between two tasks. (Or, heaven help us, more than two tasks.)



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

“We Can No Longer Ignore Evidence about Human Development”

The more teachers learn about neuroscience and psychology, the more we admire Dr. Mary Helen Immordino-Yang. Unlike most researchers, she has spent time as a classroom teacher. And, her extensive research—in both neuroscience and psychology—offers us wise perspectives on our



Posted in L&B Blog | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment