Tag Archives: classroom advice

Seriously: What Motivates Teachers to Be Funny?

To start 2021 in the right spirit, let’s think about humor in the classroom. It seems that, obviously, humor might be a good classroom strategy. When the lesson slows down, a joke or two might brighten the mood. Once we



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The Best Teaching Advice We’ve Got

You want to improve your teaching with psychology research? We’ve got good news, and bad news. And more good news. Good News: we have lots and LOTS of research. We can talk about attention, or working memory, or the spacing



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“But How Do We Know If It Works in the Classroom?”: The Latest on Retrieval Practice

We’ve heard so much about retrieval practice in the last two years that it seems like we’ve ALWAYS known about its merits. But no: this research pool hasn’t been widely known among teachers until recently. We can thank Agarwal and



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“Sooner or Later”: What’s the Best Timing for Feedback?

Given the importance of feedback for learning, it seems obvious teachers should have well-established routines around its timing. In an optimal world, would we give feedback right away? 24 hours later? As late as possible? Which option promotes learning? In



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“Rich” or “Bland”: Which Diagrams Helps Students Learn Deeply?

Colorful diagrams might raise students’ interest. What do those diagrams do for their learning? Continue reading



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“Before You Change Your Teaching, Change Your Thinking”

When I attended my first Learning and the Brain conference, more than a decade ago, I had a simple plan: Step 1: Listen to the researcher’s advice. Step 2: Do what the researcher told me to do. Step 3: Watch



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“Successive Relearning”: 1 + 1 = +10%

We know that “retrieval practice” helps students learn. We know that “spacing” does too. What happens when we combine those techniques? Continue reading



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Laptop Notes or Handwritten Notes? Even the New York Times Has It Wrong [Reposted]

Which helps students learn more: handwritten notes, or laptop notes? The best-known research on the subject might surprise you… Continue reading



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“How to Study Less and Learn More”: Explaining Learning Strategies to our Students

Because cognitive science gives us such good guidance about learning, we want to share that information with our students. “Study THIS WAY!” we cry. “Research says so!” Alas, all too often, students don’t follow our advice. A key part of



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The Limits of “Desirable Difficulties”: Catching Up with Sans Forgetica

Can a hard-to-read font improve student learning? That’s a very strange question, but in 2019 we had some reasons to think the answer was “yes.” Just published research updates our understanding. Continue reading



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