Tag Archives: classroom advice

When Multitasking Helps (And Why Teachers Should Discourage It Anyway)

We all know that multitasking is baaaaad. In fact, we all know that multitasking doesn’t happen. Instead, when we think we’re multitasking, we’re actually switching rapidly back and forth between two tasks. (Or, heaven help us, more than two tasks.)



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“We Can No Longer Ignore Evidence about Human Development”

The more teachers learn about neuroscience and psychology, the more we admire Dr. Mary Helen Immordino-Yang. Unlike most researchers, she has spent time as a classroom teacher. And, her extensive research—in both neuroscience and psychology—offers us wise perspectives on our



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Why Do Choices Interfere with Your Learning?

At times, choices might help motivate students. However, at other times, choices harm learning. When we distinguish between the two, we help our students. Continue reading



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Choosing a Knowledge-Rich Curriculum: Pros and Cons

Should our curriculum focus on knowledge or skills? Jon Brunskill debates this question with himself in this thoughtful post. Brunskill does offer a strong conclusion in this debate. But just as important: the way he frames the discussion. Following Rapoport’s Rules



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Ask a Simple Question, Get an Oversimplified Answer

Handwritten notes might help students who review them, but laptop notes seem to help those who don’t. In brief: even simple questions have complex answers. Continue reading



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Evaluating the Best Classroom Practices for Teaching Math

Analyzing TIMSS data, researchers draw tentative conclusions about math teaching: memorizing formulas & hearing lectures vs. applying math to “real life.” Continue reading



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Can Quiet Cognitive Breaks Help You Learn?

A 10-minute cognitive break improves our memory for story details. If this research pans out, it might be immensely helpful in the classroom. Watch this space… Continue reading



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How to Stop Cheating: An Awkward Debate

Despite promising early research, current findings suggest that “moral reminders” don’t prevent cheating. Alas: the “replication crisis” continues… Continue reading



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Using and Misusing Averages: The Benefits of Music?

The “10 Minute Rule” tells us that people can’t pay attention to something for longer than ten minutes. As teachers, therefore, we shouldn’t do any one thing for longer than ten minutes. We need to mix it up a bit.



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Does Hands-On Learning Benefit Science Students?

In a recent study, hands-on learning and other inquiry strategies did not help 4th graders master science concepts. The reason? Working memory limitations. Continue reading



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