Tag Archives: classroom advice

Does Teaching HANDWRITING Help Students READ?

Should schools teach handwriting? Do handwriting lessons help students read? Research from Australia offers useful insights. Continue reading



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The Big Six: A Grand Summary

You’d like a handy summary of cognitive science principles relevant to teaching? Read on… Continue reading



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Cold Calling and Bad Pizza

Teachers get contradictory advice about “cold calling.” Well designed research might offer us clear guidance. Continue reading



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Are “Retrieval Practice” and “Spacing” Equally Important? [Updated]

A recent study with college precalculus students helps us understand: is retrieval practice more important than spacing? Continue reading



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Where Should Students Study?

My teachers told me to study in the library. What does today’s research say? Continue reading



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“How We Learn”: Wise Teaching Guidance from a Really Brainy Guy

How We Learn, by Stanislas Dehaene, offers a rich and fascinating look at human brains, their ways of learning, and the best ways to teach them. Continue reading



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An Unexpected Strategy to Manage Student Stress

We might be inclined to reassure our anxious students, and advise them to “remain calm.” This research, however, suggests a surprising alternative. Continue reading



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Balancing Direct Instruction with Project-Based Pedagogies

Tom Sherrington’s essay on direct instruction and project-based pedagogies is now available on his website. And: it prompts important questions about the novice/expert continuum. Continue reading



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Concrete + Abstract = Math Learning

Should math instruction focus on concrete examples (frog puppets and oranges) or abstract representations (numbers and equations)? This research suggests: a careful balance of both. Continue reading



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When Good Classroom Assignments Go Bad

Classroom assignments often sound like great ideas, until they crash into working memory limitations. Happily, we’ve got the strategies to solve this kind of problem. Continue reading



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