Tag Archives: methodology

Avoiding Extremes: Common Sense in the Middle

Teachers feel passionate about our work. As a result, we can advocate exuberantly — occasionally too exuberantly? — for a particular position. Advocates for (or against) Social-Emotional Learning can make zealous claims for their beliefs. Same for PBL, or direct



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How to Stop Cheating: An Awkward Debate

Despite promising early research, current findings suggest that “moral reminders” don’t prevent cheating. Alas: the “replication crisis” continues… Continue reading



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Using and Misusing Averages: The Benefits of Music?

The “10 Minute Rule” tells us that people can’t pay attention to something for longer than ten minutes. As teachers, therefore, we shouldn’t do any one thing for longer than ten minutes. We need to mix it up a bit.



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Do We Actually Know What We Think We Know?

Teachers trust research when several studies reach the same result. Sadly, the current “replication crisis” means that we don’t always know what we know. Continue reading



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Understanding Scanning Technology: When and Where in the Brain

The good folks over at TedEd have produced another helpful brain video — this one exploring different brain-scanning techniques. This video does a particularly good job exploring both the strengths and the weaknesses of each technology. Location, Location…oh, and Timing



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Can You Rely on Meta-analysis? Can You Doubt It?

Over at his blog Filling the Pail, Greg Ashman likes challenging popular ideas. In a recent post, he takes issue with meta-analysis as a way of analyzing educational research. In the first place, Ashman argues — in effect —  “garbage



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Vital Resources in Psychology: the Best Research for Teachers

These vital resources in psychology research can help teachers find the most effective teaching practices. They also provide lively examples of researchers doing what they do best: exploring complex questions with imagination and humility. Continue reading



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Omega 3 Fish Oil Doesn’t Help, but Research Does

Contrary to their previous research, this team in Britain finds that Omega 3 fish oil doesn’t help students’ behavior or academic performance. These results are disappointing, but their willingness to double check their work this way is admirable. Continue reading



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Investigating Mindfulness: How Do We Know Its Benefits?

We would, of course, like to see studies with larger sample sizes, active control conditions, longer-term evaluation of results and so forth. This study find some positive trends, but overall isn’t impressed with the research progress over the last 13 years. Continue reading



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Correlation Isn’t Causation, Is It?

(Image source) The ever provocative Freddie deBoer explores the relationship between correlation and causation. You know, of course, that the one does not imply the other. DeBoer, however, wants to push your certainty on this point. Are there circumstances under



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