Category Archives: News

TOP RESEARCHERS TO EXPLORE WAYS THAT MINDSETS AFFECT ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE

MEDIA ADVISORY

January 25, 2016

Contact:

Kristin Dunay

(781)-449-4010 x 104

kristin.dunay@learningandthebrain.com

SHAPING STUDENT MINDSETS: PROMOTING ACADEMIC ATTITUDES, PERSISTENCE AND PERFORMANCE

WHAT:

Researchers have shown that changing student mindsets (beliefs and attitudes about themselves, their feelings about school and their sense of social belonging) can motivate students to work harder, be more persistent and achieve more. Students who have been told that their brains can change and therefore had a “growth mindset” (a belief that their success is based on effort and not talent or IQ) were more likely to have successful outcomes than those who were not told.

Next month, a distinguished group of academics in psychology and education will explore the science behind how mindsets can help boost academic motivation, persistence and performance and raise student achievement before 2,000 educators at the Learning & the Brain® Conference in San Francisco, CA.

SPONSORS:  The program is co-sponsored by several organizations including the School of Education at Stanford University, Building Blocks of Cognition at the University of California, Berkeley, both the Laboratory of Educational NeuroScience and the Gazzaley Cognitive Neuroscience Lab at the University of California, San Francisco, The Neuroscience Research Institute at the University of California, Santa Barbara, the Mind, Brain and Education Program at Harvard Graduate School of Education, the Comer School Development Program at Yale University School of Medicine, The Dana Foundation’s Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives, Edutopia and The George Lucas Educational Foundation, the Learning & the Brain Foundation and both national associations of elementary and secondary school principals. The event is produced by Public Information Resources, Inc.
FACULTY: 

Renowned Researcher Carol Dweck, PhD, will present on “The Psychology of Mindsets and Achievement” during a keynote on Saturday, February 13. Dr. Dweck, author of Mindset: The New Psychology of Success (2006) and one of the world’s leading researchers in the field of motivation and how to foster success, will discuss how educators can adopt a deeper growth mindset to aid in classroom practice and to support students for a more successful educational experience. Dr. Dweck is the Lewis and Virginia Eaton Professor of Psychology at Stanford University.

In addition to Dr. Dweck, the program features some other leading experts on the learning sciences including:

Ron E. Ritchhart, EdD, Senior Research Associate, Harvard Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education; Author, Creating Cultures of Thinking: The 8 Forces We Must Master to Truly Transform Our Schools (2015), Making Thinking Visible (2011) and Intellectual Character (2004)

Christine L. Carter, PhD, Sociologist; Senior Fellow, Greater Good Science Center, University of California, Berkeley; Author, The Sweet Spot: How to Find Your Groove at Home and Work (2015) and Raising Happiness: 10 Simple Steps for More Joyful Kids and Happier Parents (2011)

Joshua M. Aronson, PhD, Associate Professor of Applied Psychology; Director, Metro Center for Achievement Research and Evaluation, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development, New York University; Author, “The Threat of Stereotype” (2004, Educational Leadership); Co-Author, “Minding and Mending the Gap” (2015, Contemporary Educational Psychology); Editor, Improving Academic Achievement (2002)

Kelly M. McGonigal, PhD, Award-winning Psychology Lecturer, Stanford University, including the Stanford Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education and the Stanford School of Medicine’s Health Improvement Program; Co-Founder, Stanford Women’s Wellness Network; Author, The Upside of Stress: Why Stress is Good for You and How to Get Good at It(2015), The Willpower Instinct (2013) and The Neuroscience of Change (2012)

Kathleen Cushman, BA, Editor; Documentarian; Co-Founder, What Kids Can Do; Author, The Motivation Equation: Designing Lessons that Set Kids’ Minds on Fire (2013); Co-Author, Belonging and Becoming: The Power of Social and Emotional Learning in High Schools (2015)

Robert B. Brooks, PhD, Psychologist; Faculty, part-time, Harvard Medical School; Co-Author, “The Power of Mindsets: Nurturing Student Engagement, Motivation and Resilience in Students” (2012, Handbook of Research on Student Engagement), Raising Resilient Children (2001), The Power of Resilience: Achieving Balance, Confidence, and Personal Strength in Your Life (2004), Raising a Self-Disciplined Child (2007) and Handbook of Resilience in Children (2012)

WHEN: Friday, February 11 – Sunday, February 13. Conference begins 1:30 PM. Due to high demand, the conference is now sold out. Contact Kristin Dunay at 781-449-4010 x 104 for media passes.
WHERE: Fairmont Hotel, San Francisco, CA
Learning & the Brain® is a series of educational conferences that brings the latest research in the learning sciences and their potential applications to education to the wider educational community. Since its inception in 1999, more than 50,000 people in Boston, San Francisco, Washington, D.C., New York and Chicago have attended this series.

 

Learning & the Brain® Presented the “2015 Transforming Education Through Neuroscience Award” at Its Educational Conference in Boston on Sunday

Learning & the Brain presented Dr. Fumiko Hoeft from the University of California, San Francisco with the “2015 Transforming Education Through Neuroscience Award” for her contributions to bridging the gap between brain research and classroom practice during the Learning & the Brain educational conference in Boston, MA..

Learning & the Brain presented Dr. Fumiko Hoeft from the University of California, San Francisco with the “2015 Transforming Education Through Neuroscience Award” this past Sunday. Dr. Hoeft is a groundbreaking researcher whose research lies at the intersection of education and cognitive neuroscience was awarded the eighth annual prize for “Transforming Education Through Neuroscience.” The $2,500 award was established to honor individuals who represent excellence in bridging neuroscience and education and is funded by the Learning & the Brain Foundation.

Fumiko Hoeft, MD, PhD, is being honored for her work on learning difficulties and social-emotional learning. Dr. Hoeft received her Doctorate in Medicine and Neurophysiology from Keio University in Tokyo in 2003 and did her post-doctoral work in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience at Stanford University under neuroscientist John Gabrieli. Now at the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, Dr. Hoeft is an Associate Professor of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Director of the UCSF Hoeft Laboratory for Educational Neuroscience (brainLENS.org), and a member of the Advisory Board of the Bay Area’s Center for Childhood Creativity.

Dr. Hoeft uses neuroimaging, behavioral tools and demographic data in her research to further the understanding of the brain mechanisms behind neurodevelopmental conditions such as dyslexia and autism and educationally relevant concepts such as resilience and motivation. Much of her current research examines the interplay between genetic and environmental factors and how they influence the development of language and reading skills. Not only does she hope to help identify the most effective classroom practices and interventions for early reading education but to promote the importance of integrating education and neuroscience.

According to MIT’s John Gabrieli, “Fumiko Hoeft has made seminal discoveries about the brain basis of dyslexia that have important implications for educating children with dyslexia. Her incisive experiments have revealed neurobiological evidence relevant for etiology, diagnosis and prognosis in dyslexia.”

“As the 2015 Transforming Education Through Neuroscience Award recipient, Fumiko Hoeft, is now recognized as one of the most talented and deserving scientists working today within the emerging discipline of neuroeducation,” according to Dr. Kenneth Kosik, Harriman Professor of Neuroscience at the University of California, Santa Barbara and a co-founder of the Learning & the Brain® conference. “Her distinguished stature among both neuroscientists and educators demonstrates her remarkable ability to synthesize these two disciplines. She has created within the interface a novel and unmistakable intellectual force for unity between neuroscience and education.”

David B. Daniel, PhD, Professor of Psychology at James Madison University and the 2013 winner of the award, also had praise for the new recipient. “Dr. Hoeft’s work is a wonderful example of how innovative design in neuroscience can be used to complement, challenge and extend psychological and educational explanations of important issues.”

Dr. Daniel presented the prize to Dr. Hoeft at the upcoming Learning & the Brain® educational conference in Boston, MA on Sunday, November 15, held at the Westin Copley Hotel. The Learning & the Brain® Foundation wishes Dr. Hoeft our heartiest congratulations.

TOP RESEARCHERS TO EXPLORE WAYS THAT SCIENCE SHEDS LIGHT ON CHARACTER SKILLS

MEDIA ADVISORY

October 26, 2015

Contact:

Kristin Dunay

(781)-449-4010 x 104

kristin.dunay@learningandthebrain.com

THE SCIENCE OF CHARACTER: USING BRAIN SCIENCE TO RAISE STUDENT SELF-REGULATION, RESILIENCE AND RESPECT

WHAT:

Researchers have found that we can use the brain’s neuroplasticity to train character skills, often called non-cognitive or soft skills, in students through instruction, video games and meditation.

Next month, a distinguished group of neuroscientists, psychologists and educators will explore the science behind these character strengths and why they lead to academic and life success. They will discuss the importance of “character skills,” such as self-control, conscientiousness, resilience, grit, empathy and social-emotional skills in education and share some of the research on how to train these skills before 1,500 educators at the Learning & the Brain® Conference in Boston, MA.

SPONSORS:  The program is co-sponsored by several organizations including the Mind, Brain & Education Program at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, the Athinoula A. Martinos Imaging Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Center for Emotional Intelligence at Yale University, the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives, the Massachusetts Consortium for Social-Emotional Learning in Teacher Education, the Learning & the Brain Foundation and both national associations of elementary and secondary school principals. The event is produced by Public Information Resources, Inc.
FACULTY: 

Renowned Psychologist Walter Mischel, PhD, will present on “How Mind and Brain Enable Self-Control: The Marshmallow Test and Beyond” during a keynote on Friday, November 13. Dr. Mischel, author of The Marshmallow Test: Mastering Self-Control (2015) and pioneer in the study of self-control, will discuss his key findings from the “marshmallow experiments” – which examined the brain mechanisms that underlie and enable self-control and delay of gratification. Dr. Mischel is the Robert Johnson Niven Professor of Human Letters in the Department of Psychology at Columbia University and received the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award from the American Psychological Association.

On Sunday morning, Fumiko Hoeft, MD, PhD, will receive the 2015 Transforming Education Through Neuroscience Award from the Learning & the Brain Foundation. This award has been presented annually since 2008 to a researcher who has made significant contributions to connecting neuroscience with education. Dr. Hoeft is Associate Professor of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Director of Hoeft Laboratory for Educational Neuroscience (brainLENS.org) at the University of California, San Francisco.

In addition to Drs. Mischel and Hoeft, the program features some other leading experts on the learning sciences including:

▪   Roy F. Baumeister, PhD, Francis Eppes Professor of Psychology, Florida State University; Co-Author, Willpower: Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength (2012); Editor, Self-Esteem: The Puzzle of Low Self-Regard (2014) and Handbook of Self-Regulation: Research, Theory and Applications (2013, 2nd Edition)

▪   Kenneth R. Ginsburg, MD, Professor of Pediatrics, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania; Author, Raising Kids to Thrive: Balancing Love with Expectations and Protection With Trust (2015) and Building Resilience in Children and Teens: Giving Kids Roots and Wings (2011)

▪   Rick Hanson, PhD, Senior Fellow, Greater Good Science Center, University of California, Berkeley; Founder, Wellspring Institute for Neuroscience and Contemplative Wisdom; Author, Hardwiring Happiness: The New Brain Science of Contentment, Calm and Confidence (2013) and Buddha’s Brain: The Practical Neuroscience of Happiness, Love and Wisdom (2009)

▪   Neal H. Mayerson, PhD, Clinical Psychological; Chairman/Founder, VIA Institute on Character, who collaborated with Renowned Psychologist Dr. Martin E.P. Seligman on the founding of positive psychology and VIA; Co-Founder, Mayerson Center for Safe and Healthy Children

▪   Kimberly Schonert-Reichl, PhD, Applied Developmental Psychologist; Professor, Human Development, Learning and Culture, Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology and Special Education, University of British Columbia

▪   Laurence Steinberg, PhD, Distinguished University Professor, Temple University; Author, Age of Opportunity: Lessons from the New Science of Adolescence (2014) and Catching Up or Leading the Way (2009)

WHEN: Friday, November 13 – Sunday, November 15. Conference begins 1:30 PM. General Registration is $579 through November 6 and $599 after November 6.   Contact Kristin Dunay at 781-449-4010 x 104 for media passes.
WHERE: Westin Copley Place, Boston, MA

Learning & the Brain® is a series of educational conferences that brings the latest research in the learning sciences and their potential applications to education to the wider educational community. Since its inception in 1999, more than 50,000 people in Boston, San Francisco, Washington, D.C., New York and Chicago have attended this series.

 

For more information about the conference, visit LearningAndTheBrain.com.

TOP RESEARCHERS EXPLORE WAYS TO HELP STUDENTS MEET THE GLOBAL CHALLENGES OF THE 21st CENTURY

MEDIA ADVISORY
   May 4, 2015
Contact:Kristin Dunay(781)-449-4010 x 104kristin.dunay@learningandthebrain.com

EDUCATING WORLD-CLASS MINDS: USING COGNITIVE SCIENCE TO CREATE 21st CENTURY SCHOOLS

WHAT: This week, a distinguished group of neuroscientists, psychologists and educators will explore the cognitive skills students will need to succeed in today’s global, diverse world and ways schools need to reform to meet those needs before 1,300 educators at the Learning & the Brain® Conference in New York, NY.With a rapidly changing world, cognitive skills such as global-cultural competence, critical and scientific thinking, and world collaborations are required more than ever for career success. This conference will focus on how the learning sciences (including cognitive, social and cultural neuroscience) along with new global school models can provide ways to promote “world-class” skills and schools to improve academic performance. Discover the latest in how education can be changed to meet the needs of 21st century students.
SPONSORS AND FACULTY:     The program is co-sponsored by several organizations including the Neuroscience and Education Program at Teachers College, Columbia University, the Mind, Brain & Education Program at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and the Comer School Development Program at the Yale University School of Medicine, the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives, the Learning & the Brain Foundation, both national associations of elementary and secondary school principals, and is produced by Public Information Resources, Inc.

Steven Pinker, PhD, Harvard College Professor and Johnstone Family Professor in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University, is one of the featured speakers at the conference. Dr. Pinker is an award-winning researcher on language and cognition and has been recognized as one of the world’s top global thinkers. He is a prolific author whose books include The Stuff of Thought: Language as a Window into Human Nature (2007), The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature (2002), Words and Rules: The Ingredients of Language (1999), How the Mind Works (1997) and The Language Instinct (1994). Dr. Pinker will address the conference on the topic of “Sense of Style: The Thinking Person’s Guide to Writing in the 21st Century which will cover some of his work from his most recent book with the same title.

In addition to Dr. Pinker, the program features some of the other of the nation’s leading experts on cognitive and global learning including:

▪   David N. Perkins, PhD, Principal Investigator, Founding Member, Harvard Project Zero; Carl H. Pforzheimer, Jr., Research Professor of Teaching and Learning, Harvard Graduate School of Education; Author, Future Wise: Educating Our Children for a Changing World (2014) and Making Learning Whole: How Seven Principles of Teaching Can Transform Education (2009)

▪   Heidi Hayes Jacobs, EdD, Creator, Curriculum21; Founder and President, Curriculum Designers, Inc.; Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of Curriculum and Teaching, Teachers College, Columbia University; Author, Curriculum 21: Essential Education for a Changing World (updated 2014), Mastering Digital Literacy (2014), Mastering Global Literacy (2013) and Leading the New Literacies (2013)

▪   Pasi Sahlberg, PhD, Visiting Professor, Harvard Graduate School of Education; Adjunct Faculty of Behavioral Science, University of Helsinki; Former Director General, Ministry of Education and Culture in Helsinki, Finland; Former Senior Education Specialist, World Bank; Author, “Global Educational Reform Movement and its Impact on Schooling” (2014, The Handbook of Global Policy-making in Education) and Finnish Lessons: What Can the World Learn from Educational Change in Finland? (2011)

▪   Yong Zhao, PhD, Presidential Chair; Associate Dean for Global Education; Director, Center for Advanced Technology in Education, College of Education, University of Oregon; Author, Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Dragon?: Why China Has the Best (and Worst) Education System in the World (2014), World-Class Learners (2012) and Catching Up or Leading the Way (2009)

▪   Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, EdD, Associate Professor of Education, Rossier School of Education; Associate Professor of Psychology, Brain and Creativity Institute, University of Southern California; Co-Author, “Modularity and the Cultural Mind: Contributions of Cultural Neuroscience to Cognitive Theory” (2013, Perspectives on Psychological Science)

 

WHEN: Thursday, May 7-Saturday, May 9. Conference begins 12:45 PM. General Registration is $609. Contact Kristin Dunay at 781-449-4010 x 104 for media passes.
WHERE: Sheraton New York Times Square Hotel, New York, NY
Learning & the Brain® is a series of educational conferences that brings the latest research in neuroscience and psychology and their potential applications to education to the wider educational community. Since its inception in 1999, more than 40,000 people in Boston, San Francisco, Washington, D.C., New York and Chicago have attended this series.

For more information about the conference, visit www.learningandthebrain.com.

TOP RESEARCHERS EXPLORE WAYS TO IMPROVE MEMORY SKILLS IN STUDENTS at the LEARNING & the BRAIN® CONFERENCE

 

MEDIA ADVISORY  
February 4, 2015
Contact:Kristin Dunay(781)-449-4010 x104kristin.dunay@learningandthebrain.com

MAKING LASTING MEMORIES: USING BRAIN SCIENCE TO BOOST MEMORY, THINKING AND LEARNING

WHAT: Next week, a national group of neuroscientists, psychologists and educators will be presenting new brain research findings on memory, thinking and academic performance before 1,300 educators at the Learning & the Brain® Conference in San Francisco, CA.

Researchers are discovering strategies based on neuroscience research that make learning easier, more effective and that can boost long-term memory, thinking and academic performance. Using mnemonics, meta-cognition, physical movements and hand gestures, active learning strategies and certain testing and retrieval practices, teachers can improve their students’ ability to learn, reflect and remember content. Discover how the “Science of Learning” can help boost student retention, recall and retrieval of information.

WHO:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The program is co-sponsored by several organizations including the Stanford Graduate School of Education, Building Blocks of Cognition, University of California, Berkeley, Gazzaley Cognitive Neuroscience Lab, University of California, San Francisco, the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives, and both the national associations of elementary and secondary school principals, and is produced by Public Information Resources, Inc.

Larry R. Squire, PhD, a Professor of Psychiatry, Neuroscience and Psychology at the University of California, San Diego is one of the featured speakers at the conference. He is the co-author with Nobel Laureate Eric Kandel of Memory: From Mind to Molecules (2008).Dr. Squire will address the conference on the topic of “The Structure and Organization of Memory. He will discuss the anatomy and organization of memory, emphasizing the distinction between conscious and unconscious memory system and will examine multiple kinds of memory, which depend on different brain systems.In addition to Dr. Squire, some of the featured speakers will be:

▪   Benedict Carey, MA, Award-Winning Science Reporter at The New York Times; Author, How We Learn: The Surprising Truth About When, Where and Why it Happens (2014)

▪   Sian L. Beilock, PhD, Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology, University of Chicago; Author, How the Body Knows Its Mind: The Surprising Power of Physical Environment to Influence How You Think and Feel (2015) and Choke: What the Secrets of the Brain Reveal About Getting It Right When You Have To (2011)

▪   Sandra B. Chapman, PhD, Founder and Chief Director, Center for BrainHealth; Dee Wyly Distinguished Professor in Brain Health; Professor, School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, The University of Texas at Dallas; Co-Author, “Shorter Term Aerobic Exercise Improves Brain, Cognition, and Cardiovascular Fitness in Aging” (2013, Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience) and the book, Make Your Brain Smarter (2013)

▪   Henry L. Roediger, III, PhD, James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor, Department of Psychology; Principal Investigator, Memory Lab, Washington University in St. Louis; Co-Author, Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning (2014) and “Applications of Cognitive Science to Education” (2012, Neuroscience in Education)

▪   William R. Klemm, DVM, PhD, Professor of Neuroscience, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University; Author, Mental Biology: The New Science of How the Brain and Mind Relate (2014), Memory Power 101 (2012) and Better Grades, Less Effort (2011)

WHEN: Thursday, February 12-Saturday, February 14. Conference begins 1:00 PM. General Registration is $609. Contact Kristin Dunay at 781-449-4010 x 102 for media passes.
WHERE: Fairmont Hotel on Nob Hill, San Francisco, CA
Learning & the Brain® is a series of educational conferences that brings the latest research in neuroscience and psychology and their potential applications to education to the wider educational community. Since its inception in 1999, more than 40,000 people in Boston, San Francisco, Washington, D.C., New York and Chicago have attended this series.

For more information about the conference, visit www.learningandthebrain.com.

The 2014 Transforming Education Through Neuroscience Award Will Be Presented on Saturday at the Learning & the Brain® Educational Conference in Boston

Dr. Joanna A. Christodoulou from MGH Institute of Health Professions will be presented with the “2014 Transforming Education Through Neuroscience Award” for her contributions to the field of Mind, Brain and Education during the upcoming Learning & the Brain® educational conference in Boston, MA.

November 17, 2014 – A groundbreaking researcher whose research lies at the intersection of education and cognitive neuroscience will be awarded the seventh annual prize for “Transforming Education through Neuroscience.” The award was established by the Learning & the Brain® Foundation and The International Mind, Brain and Education Society (IMBES) to honor individuals who represent excellence in bridging neuroscience and education. The $5,000 award will be used to “support translational efforts bridging scientific findings and classroom practice.”

Joanna A. Christodoulou, Ed.D, is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the MGH Institute of Health Professions  and is being honored for her work on learning difficulties and interventions. Dr. Christodoulou received her Doctorate in Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education in 2010 and did her post-doctoral work at the Gabrieli Lab in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Now at MGH, Dr. Christodoulou leads the Brain, Education and Mind (BEAM) Team which is dedicated to conducting research to improve student outcomes by investigating factors contributing to the prevention of reading challenges, the identification of protective characteristics, and optimizing individualized interventions.

Dr. Christodoulou uses neuroimaging and behavioral tools in her research and works with participants as young as four years old through adulthood. She integrates the role of clinician, cognitive developmental neuroscientist and educator in her work. Her primary research focus has been the development of reading and related skills, and approaches to harnessing individual variability to improve educational outcomes. Dr. Christodoulou works on identifying risk factors from school and home associated with learning challenges, investigating effective identification of learning difficulties across clinical and research settings and optimizing intervention practices for struggling students.

“Joanna Christodoulou has been a pioneer in the integration between pressing issues in education, especially in regards to reading and dyslexia, and cutting-edge methods for neuroimaging of the human brain,” according to Dr. John D.E. Gabrieli, a neuroscientist at the McGovern Institute for Brain Research and Director of the Martinos Imaging Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “She is a talented communicator, who makes clear to teachers what neuroscience can contribute to education, and makes clear to neuroscientists what students and teachers need to know.”

Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, Ed.D, Associate Professor of Psychology, Brain and Creativity Institute, University of Southern California and the 2008 winner of the award also had praise for the new recipient. “Dr. Christodoulou’s work is groundbreaking especially for its focus on integrating clinical perspectives with educational perspectives while honoring individual differences in children’s learning. Her research leads to novel insights about the neural bases of reading acquisition, yet also keeps the whole child in focus—translating the technical findings into practical, translational applications in real-world educational contexts.”

The prize will be presented by Dr. David Daniel, who was last year’s recipient of the award, at the upcoming Learning & the Brain® educational conference in Boston, MA on Saturday, November 22, held at the Westin Copley Hotel. The Learning & the Brain® Foundation and the International Mind Brain and Education Society wish Dr. Christodoulou their heartiest congratulations.

BRAIN EXPERTS TO SHOW WAYS TO ENGAGE STUDENT FOCUS AND REDUCE DISTRACTIONS at the LEARNING & the BRAIN® CONFERENCE

 

MEDIA ADVISORY

October 27, 2014
Contact:Kristin Dunay(781)-449-4010 x102
kristin.dunay@learningandthebrain.com

FOCUSED ORGANIZED MINDS: USING BRAIN SCIENCE
TO ENGAGE ATTENTION IN A DISTRACTED WORLD

WHAT: Classroom attention is under siege. Today’s technology is creating more classroom distractions and disorganization. Yet, academic testing and Common Core State Standards require students to be more focused and organized than ever in order to succeed in school. Neuroscience may offer a way to engage these attention, organization and study skills. A national group of neuroscientists, psychologists and educators will be presenting research, classroom strategies and new cognitive technologies to improve student focus, planning and executive function skills before 1,300 educators at this month’s Learning & the Brain® Conference in Boston, MA.

Renowned psychologist and science journalist Daniel J. Goleman, PhD, will open the conference on the afternoon of Thursday, November 20 with a keynote presentation on “Focus in Learning.”By combining cutting-edge neuroscience research with practical findings, Dr. Goleman will delve into the science of attention. In an era of unstoppable distractions, he will argue that now more than ever, students must learn to sharpen their focus if they are to survive in a complex world. Dr. Goleman was twice nominated for the Pulitzer Prize, is a Former Visiting Faculty Member at Harvard University and is the author of several books including Focus: The Hidden Driver of Excellence (2013), Social Intelligence (2006) and Emotional Intelligence (1995)

Renowned neuroscientist Daniel J. Levitin, PhD, FRSC, will present one of the first public talks on his just released book, The Organized Mind, during a keynote on Saturday, November 22. Dr. Levitin will discuss how the latest findings from brain science can help us to regain a sense of mastery over the way we organize our homes, workplaces, time and lives in the age of information overload. Dr. Levitin is Professor of Psychology and Behavioral Neuroscience at McGill University and is the author of The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload (2014), Foundations of Cognitive Psychology (2010) and This Is Your Brain On Music (2006)

Also on the morning of Saturday, November 22, Joanna A. Christodoulou, EdD, Assistant Professor at the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the MGH Institute of Health Professions at Massachusetts General Hospital, will be presented with the 2014 “Transforming Education Through Neuroscience” Award for a junior researcher who has advanced the field of neuroeducation. The $5,000 award was established by the Learning & the Brain Foundation and the International Mind, Brain and Education Society (IMBES) to honor an individual who represents excellence in bridging neuroscience and education.

Dr. Christodoulou will address the conference on the topic of “New Frontiers in Education Neuroscience: A Survey of Cases Informing the Scienceof Reading”. She will discuss how the feat of reading can be achieved with alternative mechanisms in light of structural or functional brain differences in readers. Rather than study how brains differ among reader groups, she is exploring how readers with distinct brain characteristics are able to still accomplish the feat of reading. She believes that studying distinct reader groups will help enhance our understanding of brain plasticity and reading difficulties.
 

WHO: The program is co-sponsored by several organizations including the Harvard Graduate School of Education, the Athinoula A. Martinos Imaging Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives, and both the national associations of elementary and secondary school principals, and is produced by Public Information Resources, Inc.

In addition to Drs. Goleman, Levitin and Christodoulou, some of the other featured speakers will be:

 ▪   Margaret Moore, MBA, (aka Coach Meg), Co-Founder/ Co-Director, Institute of Coaching, McLean Hospital, Affiliate of Harvard Medical School; Author, Organize Your Mind, Organize Your Life (2012) and “Train Your Brain to Focus” (2012, Harvard Business Review)

▪   Catherine Steiner-Adair, EdD, Clinical Instructor, Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School; Associate Psychologist, McLean Hospital; Author, The Big Disconnect: Protecting Childhood and Family Relationships in the Digital Age (2013)

▪   Adam H. Gazzaley, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Neurology, Physiology and Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco; Assistant Adjunct Professor, Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Berkeley; Host of the PBS-Special, The Distracted Mind

WHEN: Thursday, November 20-Saturday, November 22. Conference begins 1:15 PM. General Registration is $589 until Nov. 7 and $609 after Nov. 1. Contact Kristin Dunay at 781-449-4010 x 102 for media passes.
WHERE: Westin Copley Place, Boston, MA

Learning & the Brain® is a series of educational conferences that brings the latest research in neuroscience and psychology and their potential applications to education to the wider educational community and provides professional development for educators. Since its inception in 1999, this series has been attended by more than 40,000 people in Boston, San Francisco, Washington, D.C., New York and Chicago.
 
For more information about the conference, visit www.learningandthebrain.com.

TOP RESEARCHERS EXPLORE THE SCIENCE OF SMARTER MINDS at the LEARNING & the BRAIN® CONFERENCE

MEDIA ADVISORY


April 11, 2014

Contact: Kristin Dunay(781)-449-4010 x 102kristin.dunay@learningandthebrain.com 

THE SCIENCE OF SMARTER MINDS:
TEACHING TO THINK, CREATE AND INNOVATE FOR SCHOOL AND CAREERS

WHAT: Encouraging the development of critical and creative thinking in students is now recognized as central to education. Both new Common Core and Next Generation Science Standards stress these thinking skills and a recent study by the Center on Education and the Workforce found that these skills will be crucial in getting future jobs. Next month’s Learning & the Brain® Conference in New York, NY, will bring a renowned group of neuroscientists, psychologists and educators to present new research findings on critical and creative thinking, problem solving, innovation, intelligence and thinking processing in reading, math and sciences before 1,200 educators.  The conference will explore ways to use the science of “smarter minds” to teach the skills students need to meet today’s new standards, curriculum and future careers.
WHO: The program is co-sponsored by several organizations including the Neuroscience and Education Program, Teachers College, Columbia University, Mind, Brain & Education Program, Harvard Graduate School of Education, Comer School Development Program, Yale University School of Medicine, the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives, and both the national associations of elementary and secondary school principals, and is produced by Public Information Resources, Inc.Eric Kandel, MD, a Nobel Laureate in Medicine and University and Fred Kavli Professor at Columbia University, will give the opening keynote at the conference on the topic of “The Age of Insight: Art, Brain and the Creative Beholder.”  He will use the work of Rokitansky, Freud, Riegl, Klimt, Kokoschka and Schiele as examples of how Vienna in 1900 was able to forge a bridge between art and science in an effort to better understand creativity.  Dr. Kandel is also the Director of the Kavli Institute for Brain Science at Columbia University and the Founding Director of the Center for Neurobiology and Behavior at the Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons;.  He is also the author of several books including Age of Insight (2012) and In Search of Memory (2007).In addition to Dr. Kandel, some of the featured speakers will be:▪    Sandra B. Chapman, PhD, Founder/Chief Director, Center for BrainHealth; Dee Wyly Distinguished Chair; Professor of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, The University of Texas at Dallas; Co-Author, Make Your Brain Smarter: Increase Your Brain’s Creativity, Energy, and Focus (2013)▪    Arthur L. Costa, EdD, Emeritus Professor of Education, California State University, Sacramento; Co-Director of the Institute for Intelligent Behavior; Former President of ASCD; Former Director of Educational Programs, NASA; Co-Author, Cognitive Capital (2013) and Thinking-Based Learning (2010)

▪    Arthur B. Markman, PhD, Annabel Iron Worsham Centennial Professor, Department of Psychology, The University of Texas at Austin; Executive Editor, Cognitive Science; Author, Smart Thinking: Three Essential Keys to Solve Problems, Innovate and Get Things Done (2012)

▪    Camilla P. Benbow, EdD, Dean of Education and Human Development, Peabody College, Vanderbilt University; Co-Director of the Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth; Co-Author, “Creativity and Technical Innovation: Spatial Ability’s Unique Role” (2013, Psychological Science)

▪    Tony Wagner, MAT, EdD, Expert in Residence, Innovation Laboratory, Harvard University; Founder/Co-Director, Change Leadership Group, Harvard Graduate School of Education; Author, Creating Innovators: The Making of Young People Who Will Change the World (2012)

 

WHEN: Thursday, May 8-Saturday, May 10. Conference begins 1:00 PM. General Registration is $579 through April 25 and $599 after April 25.  Contact Kristin Dunay at 781-449-4010 x 102 for media passes.
WHERE: Sheraton Times Square Hotel, New York, NY
Learning & the Brain® is a series of educational conferences that brings the latest research in neuroscience and psychology and their potential applications to education to the wider educational community. Since its inception in 1999, more than 40,000 people in Boston, San Francisco, Washington, D.C., New York and Chicago have attended this series.

For more information about the conference, visit www.learningandthebrain.com.

TOP RESEARCHERS EXPLORE WAYS TO IMPROVE SOCIAL-EMOTIONAL SKILLS IN STUDENTS at the LEARNING & the BRAIN® CONFERENCE

 

MEDIA ADVISORY


January 28, 2014

Contact:

Kristin Dunay

(781)-449-4010 x 102

kristin.dunay@learningandthebrain.com

 

TEACHING SELF-AWARE MINDS: USING BRAIN SCIENCE TO BOOST SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL SKILLS

WHAT: Cognitive and Social Neuroscience research has found that social-emotional skills, such as self-awareness, self-regulation and resilience, are often more important than IQ for academic and later life success. Yet, many students today lack these necessary skills. A national group of neuroscientists, psychologists and educators will be presenting new brain research findings on self-awareness, self-control, relationships and resilience before 1,500 educators at next month’s Learning & the Brain® Conference in San Francisco, CA. They will also provide new strategies and new cognitive technologies for improving these skills in the brain to help students succeed in today’s standards-based, distracted, disconnected, digital age.
WHO: The program is co-sponsored by several organizations including the Stanford University School of Education, the Greater Goods Science Center at the University of California, Berkeley, the Laboratory of Educational Neuroscience at the University of California, San Francisco, the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives, and both the national associations of elementary and secondary school principals, and is produced by Public Information Resources, Inc.

Antonio R. Damasio, MD, PhD, the David Dornsife Professor of Neuroscience at the University of Southern California, will be a featured speaker at the conference.  He is also a Professor of Psychology and Neurology and the Director of the Brain and Creativity Institute there as well as an Adjunct Professor at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. Dr. Damasio’ research has focused on the neural basis of emotions and the role emotions play in decision-making, memory, language and consciousness.  He is the author of many academic articles and several books including Self Comes to Mind (2010), Descartes’ Error: Emotion, Reason, and the Human Brain (2005) and Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow and the Feeling Brain (2003).

In addition to Dr. Damasio, some of the featured speakers will be:

▪    Patricia S. Churchland, BPhil, LLD, President’s Professor of Philosophy Emerita, Department of Philosophy, University of California, San Diego; Adjunct Professor, Salk Institute for Biological Studies; Author, Touching a Nerve: The Self as Brain (2013), Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us about Morality (2011), Brain-Wise: Studies in Neurophilosophy (2002) and The Computational Brain (1992)

▪    Edward M. Hallowell, MD, Child and Adult Psychiatrist; Founder, The Hallowell Center for Cognitive and Emotional Health (Boston, New York, San Francisco); Former Faculty, Harvard Medical School; Author, Shine: Using Brain Science to Get the Best from Your People (2011), Overloaded Circuits (2009), CrazyBusy: Overstretched, Overbooked, and About to Snap! (2006), Childhood Roots of Adult Happiness (2003) and Connect (2001)

▪    Michael S. Gazzaniga, PhD, Professor of Psychology; Director, SAGE Center for the Study of Mind, University of California, Santa Barbara; President, Cognitive Neuroscience Institute; Author; Who’s in Charge?: Free Will and the Science of the Brain (2012), Human: The Science Behind What Makes Us Unique (2008), The Ethical Brain: The Science of Our Moral Dilemmas (2006) and The Mind’s Past (2000)

▪    Adam H. Gazzaley, MD, PhD, Director, Gazzaley Cognitive Neuroscience Research Lab; Associate Professor of Neurology, Physiology and Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco; Assistant Adjunct Professor, Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Berkeley; Host of the PBS-Special “The Distracted Mind”; Co-Author, “Video game training enhances cognitive control in older adults” (2013, Nature)

▪    Denise C. Pope, PhD, Senior Lecturer, Stanford University School of Education; Co-Founder, Challenge Success; Author, “Beyond ‘Doing School’: From ‘Stressed-Out’ to ‘Engaged in Learning” (2010, Education Canada) and Doing School: How We Are Creating a Generation of Stressed Out, Materialistic, and Mis-educated Students (2001); Co-Author, “Success with Less Stress” (2009, Educational Leadership); Winner of the 2012 Education Professor of the Year “Educators’ Voice Award” from the Academy of Education Arts and Sciences

 

WHEN: Thursday, February 13-Saturday, February 15. Conference begins 1:00 PM. General Registration is $579 through January 31 and $599 after January 31.  Contact Kristin Dunay at 781-449-4010 x 102 for media passes.
WHERE: Fairmont Hotel on Nob Hill, San Francisco, CA
Learning & the Brain® is a series of educational conferences that brings the latest research in neuroscience and psychology and their potential applications to education to the wider educational community. Since its inception in 1999, this series has been attended by more than 40,000 people in Boston, San Francisco, Washington, D.C., New York and Chicago.

 

For more information about the conference, visit www.learningandthebrain.com.

2013 Transforming Education Through Neuroscience Award will be presented at the Learning & the Brain® Educational Conference in Boston this week

At the upcoming Learning & the Brain® educational conference in Boston, MA, the 2013 Transforming Education Through Neuroscience Award will be presented to Dr. David B. Daniel from James Madison University for his contributions to the field of Mind, Brain and Education.

November 12, 2013 – A pioneering educator and researcher who studies classroom pedagogy, cognitive development and the translation of Mind, Brain and Education to teaching practice will be awarded the sixth annual prize for “Transforming Education through Neuroscience.” The award was established by the Learning & the Brain Foundation and The International Mind, Brain and Education Society (IMBES) to honor an individual who represents excellence in bridging neuroscience and education. The $5,000 award will be used to “support translational efforts bridging scientific findings and classroom practice.”

David B. Daniel, PhD, a James Madison University professor, is being honored for his tireless and creative efforts to develop the infrastructure of the field of Mind, Brain and Education, which tries to focus research in neuroscience, cognitive science and other fields onto classrooms and learning. Along with his efforts to create better teaching and learning in K-12 schools and at the university level, Dr. Daniel has been facilitating the building of sound organizational structures and effective communication processes in the field of Mind, Brain and Education for many years. He is a founding IMBES board member and former executive director of the Society. He has also been the managing editor of Mind, Brain and Education, the first journal focusing on the intersection between education, neuroscience, cognitive science and other fields, since it began. The journal was recognized in 2008 as the “Best New Journal in the Humanities and Social Sciences” by the Association of American Publishers Academic Division.

According to Kurt Fischer, Charles Warland Bigelow Professor and director of the Harvard Mind, Brain and Education Program, “David Daniel has been the most important force behind the creation of the journal Mind, Brain, and Education and its success in connecting the work of teachers and researchers around the world. Quietly behind the scenes he has made things happen productively and thoughtfully. We appreciate his broad and deep contributions to the International Mind, Brain, and Education Society, the journal, and so many activities that are bringing together researchers and practitioners everywhere.”

Dr. Daniel has been a strong advocate for the careful translation of appropriate scientific findings to practice, and has wisely urged caution for doing so prematurely. “In a field where it’s easy to get carried away by theory, David Daniel stands out as a voice for keeping the eye of the scientist on the classroom–as well as encouraging teachers to keep an eye on the laboratory. He is the most sensible scientist I know in this regard,” wrote Daniel Willingham, professor of psychology at the University of Virginia.

Especially important is his framing of an ecological approach to pedagogical research, which works to specify how controlled cognitive laboratory environments alter and simplify learning situations, often rendering the findings difficult or impossible to realistically implement in real-world contexts. Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, assistant professor at the University of Southern California stated that, “Dr. Daniel exemplifies the rare scholar who recognizes the complexity of the dynamic interaction between teaching and learning, and understands how to responsibly translate scientific findings into educational initiatives.”

While his high quality teaching brings him the most accolades, Dr. Daniel provides continual, but often low-profile, mentoring and advising of teachers and young interdisciplinary scholars.  He helps them make optimal contributions to the field and simultaneously furthers their own thinking and career goals. You will find Dr. Daniel’s name in the acknowledgements of many articles and books in the field. He has also played a critical role in facilitating high-quality dialogue between researchers and educational practitioners in a variety of settings. As with his efforts to develop the field, Dr. Daniel generally works quietly behind the scenes, looking for strategic, genuine and sound ways to move the field forward by supporting others in meaningfully connecting their research with practice.

Daniel Ansari, a neuroscientist and associate professor at the University of Western Ontario, wrote, “Dr. Daniel is one of the few people who really sits in the middle between science and practice and is committed to establishing ways of crossing between the two. This is a rare and difficult balancing act, but essential for the field to grow.”

The prize will be presented to Dr. Daniel by Professor Fischer at the upcoming Learning & the Brain® educational conference in Boston, MA on Saturday, November, 16, held at the Westin Copley Hotel.  The Learning & the Brain Foundation and the International Mind Brain and Education Society wish Dr. Daniel our heartiest congratulations.