Monthly Archives: April 2019

A Rose by Any Other Name Would Smell as Confusing

All too often, psychology discussions use confusing — or worse, deliberately cheerful — terminology. Teachers should seek out direct and neutral terms to simplify and clarify our discussions. Continue reading



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No, Brain Scans Can’t See You Think

https://npjscilearncommunity.nature.com/users/19663-tracey-tokuhama-espinosa/posts/42620-deciphering-fact-from-fiction-about-the-brain Continue reading



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Does Low-Structure Free Time Improve Executive Function?

Students can be taught executive-function skills that help in schools. They learn executive-function skills that help outside of school by playing on their own. Both kinds of practice help children mature. Continue reading



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Great Myths of Adolescence by  Jeremy D. Jewell, Michael I. Axelrod, Mitchell M. Prinstein, and Stephen Hupp

Do you think that teenagers today are lazier, riskier, and more self-absorbed than previous generations? Great Myths of Adolescence by Jeremy D. Jewell, Michael I. Axelrod, Mitchell J. Prinstein, and Stephen Hupp aims to correct that belief. Their book, which will



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The Best-Known Neural Model of Learning Might be Substantially Wrong

A new neural model of long-term memory formation might change our understanding of learning. It should not, however, change our approaches to teaching. Continue reading



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Building a Better Research Mousetrap: @justsaysinmice

A new twitter account can help you sort the good science reporting from the bad. And, it’s got cute pictures too. Continue reading



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Meet Blake Harvard, “Effortful Educator”

An interview with Blake Harvard: high-school psychology teacher, and Effortful Educator. Continue reading



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Surprise: Screen Time (Even Before Bed) Doesn’t Harm Adolescents

A very large study with more than 17,000 people suggests that screen time isn’t really harming adolescent well-being. If that’s true, we should focus our efforts on finding and solving real problems in adolescent life, and not be distracted by sincere but inaccurate hype. Continue reading



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STOP THE PRESSES (And Yet, Remain Calm)

In the world of science, if you see the right kind of evidence, you have to change your mind. As of this blog post, I might start changing my mind. Regular readers know that I frequently decry false claims about



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How to (Un)Make System-Wide Changes Based on Research

We might be eager to hurry up and change everything to make our schools better. By rolling out one change at a time, and by agreeing on criteria for success and failure in advance, we can raise the likelihood that our changes will help students learn. Continue reading



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