Monthly Archives: September 2018

The Best Way to Read? Paper vs. Screens

The “paper vs. screens” debate has a clear winner: in most circumstances, students understand better and learn more when they read from paper. Continue reading



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Video: Stress and Memory

The folks over at TedEd have posted an excellent video exploring the relationship between stress and memory. The video lasts only a few minutes, but it includes lots of helpful information. In particular, note that we can’t simply say “stress



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The Self-Control Paradox: Resistance is (Often) Futile

The “self-control paradox” leads to a surprise. We shouldn’t help students resist temptation. Instead, we want them to avoid temptation in the first place. Continue reading



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Twice Exceptional: Supporting and Educating Bright and Creative Students With Learning Difficulties by Scott Barry Kaufman

Students who have both exceptional talents and learning difficulties have been understudied and underserved in the educational system. Fortunately, Twice Exceptional: Supporting and Educating Bright and Creative Students with Learning Difficulties helps shed light on this unique and diverse population. 



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Do We Actually Know What We Think We Know?

Teachers trust research when several studies reach the same result. Sadly, the current “replication crisis” means that we don’t always know what we know. Continue reading



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Sad News

  Like so many who study psychology, we at LatB are terribly sad to learn that Walter Mischel has died. The New York Times obituary describes his importance — both in revolutionizing the field of psychology, and in popular understanding



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Have We Finally Arrived at 2nd Grade?

When I first met him, Kurt Fischer used to say “when it comes to the brain, we’re all still in kindergarten.” (Who’s Kurt Fischer? Well, if you want to connect psychology, neuroscience, and education, you’re following Kurt’s work. He started



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Update on “Collaborative Learning”

Last week, I wrote about a potential strategy for making group-work more effective. A Boston-based research team has found reason to think that “intermittent” collaboration might yield better results than constant (or absent) collaboration. Although I’m excited to see these



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The Unexpected Dangers of Reading (and Writing) Blogs

A recent post on a well-known education blog beats up on that old nemesis: “rote memorization.” To highlight this point, the author links to a study on the benefits of “the generation effect.” When students try to guess at answers



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What’s the Best Timing for Collaborative Learning?

Learning can be a lonely business. Does collaborative learning help students? If yes, what guidelines should teachers follow? Collaborative Learning: Benefits and Detriments Overall, we’ve got lots of research suggesting that collaboration helps students learn. And, happily, it doesn’t cost



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