Monthly Archives: July 2018

Can a Quick Bicycle Ride Help You Learn Better?

Can exercise improve memory? That fascinating question has inspired a lot of research. The answer you get often depends quite specifically on the kind of exercise, and the kind of memory, that you study. For example, a recent study asks



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Your Brain Headlines of the Week

Every week generates lots of interesting research in brain-world. These headlines most grabbed my attention:



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Reach for greatness: Personalizable Education for All Children by Yong Zhao

Yong Zhao, University of Kansas Professor of education, has published over 30 books, including a few reviewed here at Learning and the Brain about the importance of entrepreneurship and  creativity  for producing a well-educated citizenry, even though the educational culture



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Problems in Science Communication, Part I: Too Much Skepticism

When teachers question guidance offered by outside research experts, we might be faulted for “too much skepticism.” Yet expertise is more useful and meaningful when provided by insiders. Effective science communication depends on researchers who know schools and classrooms through day-to-day experience. Continue reading



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Don’t Miss This Handy Compilation of Research Summaries

Over at Teacherhead, Tom Sherrington has gathered more than a dozen summaries of teaching research. Any one of them will provide lots of useful information. The whole collection makes a great library. To be clear: any such collection will include



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Preschool for Parents: Surprising Long-Term Benefits

Head Start programs prepare young children — especially those from lower socio-economic cohorts — for success in school. Can these programs help more if extended by the parents? Continue reading



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You Are a Learning Style of One

Many educational fads ask teachers to sort our students into false learning categories: by learning style, for example, or by gender. Instead, we should focus on cognitive processes — like memory and attention — that apply to all our students. As learners we can’t be categorized, but we’re more alike than different. Continue reading



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