Category Archives: L&B Blog

Meet the Keynotes: Mary Helen Immordino-Yang

If you’re as excited for our November conference as I am, you might want to know more about our speakers. Mary Helen Immordino-Yang is an affective neuroscientist and an educational psychologist. That means: she studies how “children’s emotional and social



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“If I Want My Students to Learn Math, Should I Teach Them More Math?”

We all agree, I suspect, that students should learn math. And reading. They should learn history. And science. SO MANY other topics. What’s the best way to meet these goals? If I want my students to learn math, is math



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How Psychologists and Teachers Can Talk about Research Most Wisely

Dr. Neil Lewis thinks a lot about science communication: in fact, his appointment at Cornell is in both the Psychology AND the Communications departments. (For a complete bio, click here.) He and Dr. Jonathan Wai recently posted an article focusing on



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“Before You Change Your Teaching, Change Your Thinking”

When I attended my first Learning and the Brain conference, more than a decade ago, I had a simple plan: Step 1: Listen to the researcher’s advice. Step 2: Do what the researcher told me to do. Step 3: Watch



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“Successive Relearning”: 1 + 1 = +10%

We know that “retrieval practice” helps students learn. We know that “spacing” does too. What happens when we combine those techniques? Continue reading



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The Benefits of “Testing” Depend on the DEFINITION of “Testing.” And the TIMING. And…

Should we test our students or not? Researchers can answer that question only by defining “test” very precisely. Happily, we’ve got research on one kind of PRE-test that just might help students learn and understand. Continue reading



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Can We Improve Our Students’ Executive Function? Will That Help Them Read Better?

New research suggests that the right kind of Executive Function training just might help struggling readers. Continue reading



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outdoor learning advantage

The Best Length of Time for a Class [Repost]

Quite consistently, this post has been among the most searched for and most popular on the blog. Teachers and administrators REALLY want to know: What is the optimal amount of time for our students to meet? What’s the very best



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Laptop Notes or Handwritten Notes? Even the New York Times Has It Wrong [Reposted]

Which helps students learn more: handwritten notes, or laptop notes? The best-known research on the subject might surprise you… Continue reading



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Growing Mindsets in Argentina? [Repost]

A study with 12th graders in Argentina highlights an important message about Growth Mindset: doing one thing once is unlikely to have much of an effect. Continue reading



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