Promoting Motivation?

Over at 3 Star Learning Experiences, Kirschner and Neelan are skeptical about research into academic motivation. In essence, they argue that defining motivation can be quite a trick, and measuring it even more so. If we struggle to define and



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The Battle of the Sexes, in Headlines

Two articles jumped out at me today because of the illustrative way they clash with each other. Writing on Twitter, and providing helpful links to several sources, Adam Grant argues that “Differences between Men and Women are Vastly Exaggerated.” Whereas



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Cell Phones in the Classroom: Expected (and Unexpected) Effects

Quick! Where’s your cell phone? Now that I’ve got your attention: what effect does the location of your cell phone have on your attention? Researchers have recently found some predictable answers to that question–as well as some rather surprising ones.



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Emotional Intelligence: Teachers’ Perspectives

The National Network of State Teachers of the Year has released a report on teaching emotional intelligence. Overall, they find research in this field persuasive. That is, these award-winning teachers think it likely that social/emotional intelligence can be taught, and



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Home News

I’ll be on vacation during the month of August; in fact, I’ll be out of the country and away from the interwebs for much of that time. And so, posting will be light while I’m away: perhaps an article a



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Helping Students Study Well: The Missing Plank in the Bridge?

Ok: you’ve taught your students a particular topic, and you’ve provided them with lots of ways to review and practice for the upcoming test. But, will they do so? How can you ensure that they prepare most effectively? Patricia Chen’s research



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How to Lie with Graphs

A handy video from Ted Education gives some pointers on spotting misleading graphs. Pay close attention to their warnings about meddling with the y-axis. Believe it or not, this sort of thing happens frequently in the world of science publishing.



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“One Size Fits All” Rarely Fits

If you attend Learning and the Brain conferences, or read this blog regularly, you know all about the well-researched benefits of retrieval practice. (You can read earlier articles on this subject here and here.) The short version of the story: if



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Rates of ADHD Diagnosis: Age, Gender, and Race

Dr. David Rabiner offers a helpful summary of trends in ADHD diagnoses. The short version: rates of diagnosis continue to increase. The longer version: depending how you analyze the categories, you get very different results. For children younger than 5,



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Chocolate and Cocoa Help You Learn, Right?

What’s not to love? The photo shows a mug of cocoa, with an already-nibbled chocolate bar in the background. Even better, the headline alerts us that both the cocoa and the chocolate “enhance cognitive abilities and memory.” For once, this headline



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