The Best-Known Neural Model of Learning Might be Substantially Wrong

A new neural model of long-term memory formation might change our understanding of learning. It should not, however, change our approaches to teaching. Continue reading



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Building a Better Research Mousetrap: @justsaysinmice

A new twitter account can help you sort the good science reporting from the bad. And, it’s got cute pictures too. Continue reading



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Meet Blake Harvard, “Effortful Educator”

An interview with Blake Harvard: high-school psychology teacher, and Effortful Educator. Continue reading



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Surprise: Screen Time (Even Before Bed) Doesn’t Harm Adolescents

A very large study with more than 17,000 people suggests that screen time isn’t really harming adolescent well-being. If that’s true, we should focus our efforts on finding and solving real problems in adolescent life, and not be distracted by sincere but inaccurate hype. Continue reading



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STOP THE PRESSES (And Yet, Remain Calm)

In the world of science, if you see the right kind of evidence, you have to change your mind. As of this blog post, I might start changing my mind. Regular readers know that I frequently decry false claims about



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How to (Un)Make System-Wide Changes Based on Research

We might be eager to hurry up and change everything to make our schools better. By rolling out one change at a time, and by agreeing on criteria for success and failure in advance, we can raise the likelihood that our changes will help students learn. Continue reading



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Working Memory Overload Throws Neurons Out of Synch

Students use working memory all day long, but they — and we — don’t have very much. New research is starting to explain what happens when they experience working memory overload. In brief: brain regions that must function synchronously stop doing so. Some day this research field might help our students learn more effectively. Continue reading



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Is Failure Productive? (Hint: We Should Ask a Better Question)

Two research groups studied (more or less) the same technique with two different student populations — and got very different answer. These contradictory findings give teachers important lessons about using psychology and education research most wisely. Continue reading



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The Simplest Motivation Strategy that You’re (Probably) Not Using

Two simple techniques to overcome mundane daily obstacles make it much likelier that our students — and we — will get work done. Continue reading



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The Debate Continues: Being Bilingual Doesn’t Improve Executive Function

Adding to a complex research history, a new study finds that being bilingual did not increase executive function. Given the complexity of this question, perhaps we should focus on the obvious benefits of being bilingual: we can meet and talk with more people. Continue reading



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