Speakers and Sessions

TEACHING STUDENTS TO KNOW AND TO THINK FOR A COMPLEX WORLD


Students today face a world full of problems, falsehoods, and future careers that require critical thinking and expertise.

Future of Jobs 2020 Report released by the World Economic Forum found that the need for critical thinking, analysis, and complex problem-solving are among the top sought after skills among employers over the next five years. Yet, many students lack these basic skills. A 2019 MindEdge Survey found that 74% of millennials and 69% of college students failed to pass a quiz on critical thinking skills.

2018 study by the MIT Sloan School found that falsehoods are 70% more likely to be retweeted on Twitter than truth. Yet studies show many children lack the basic skills needed to distinguish fact from fiction. A 2019 report  from the Stanford Higher Education Group found the majority of the 9-12th graders in the study lacked basic digital evaluation skills and two-thirds couldn’t tell the difference between real news stories and ads, while a 2019 study by Reboot Foundation revealed that over a third of middle schoolers say they “rarely” or “never” learn how to judge the reliability of media sources. However, learning science research shows these skills can be trained.

This conference will explore the science behind, and strategies for, improving knowledge and expertise. Discover how to hone reasoning; teach critical and math thinking; improve reading and media literacy; develop metacognition, executive, and problem-solving skills; and gain knowledge about the role of emotions and gestures in improving learning. 

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This conference will be presented as a hybrid conference.  You can either attend in person in New York or participate virtually.  Click here for more details.

Click here for COVID-19 policies at the venue and for COVID-19 cancellation policies.

 

The very processes that teachers care about most—critical thinking processes such as reasoning and problem solving—are intimately intertwined with factual knowledge.”
— Daniel T. Willingham, PhD
      University of Virginia


LEARNING OBJECTIVES

You will gain knowledge about:

  • The building blocks of knowledge in the brain
  • Strategies to teach students visible and critical thinking
  • Developing rationality and training reasoning abilities in class
  • Working memory, learning to learn, and knowledge acquisition
  • Promoting practice and expertise and developing expert learners
  • How emotions and embodied cognition improve thinking in the brain
  • Improving learning for all students with unlearning and UDL strategies
  • Teaching metacognition, executive function, and reflection skills
  • Learning media literacy and how to recognize facts vs. fiction
  • The knowledge gap, reading, and mathematical thinking

 

WHO SHOULD ATTEND

Educators, Parents
Curriculum, Staff Developers
Speech-Language Pathologists
PreK-12 Teachers, Administrators
Learning Specialists, Special Educators
Psychologists, School Psychologists, Counselors
Early Childhood Educators, Professionals
Reading, Math, Science, Technology Teachers
Superintendents, Principals, School Heads
Adolescent Educators, Clinicians, Counselors
Administrators, Deans, Curriculum Directors
Guidance, Career, College Counselors
College, University Professors

Featured Speakers

Rationality: What It Is, Why It Seems Scarce, and Why It Matters

Steven A. Pinker, PhD

Cognitive Psychologist; Johnstone Family Professor, Department of Psychology, Harvard University; Member, National Academy of Sciences; Named Time Magazine’s “100 Most Influential People in the World Today”; Author, Rationality: What It Is, Why It Seems Scarce, Why It Matters (2021), Enlightenment Now (2018), The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person’s Guide to Writing in the 21st Century (2014), Language, Cognition, and Human Nature (2013), The Stuff of Thought (2007), and How the Mind Works (1997)

The Story Paradox: How Stories Affect Our Brains, Bind Us Together, or Circumvent Rational Thought

Jonathan A. Gottschall, PhD

Distinguished Fellow, English Department, Washington & Jefferson College; Contributor, Psychology Today; Writer, The New York Times, Scientific American, The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Science, Nature and The Chronicle of Higher Education; Author, The Story Paradox: How Our Love for Storytelling Builds Societies and Tears Them Down (2021) and The Storytelling Animal (2015)

The Knowledge Gap: Why the Standard Approach to Reading Comprehension Conflicts With Cognitive Science

Natalie L. Wexler, JD

Education Writer; Senior Contributor, Forbes.com; Author, “Building Knowledge: What an Elementary Curriculum Should Do” (2020, American Educator) and The Knowledge Gap: The Hidden Cause of America's Broken Education System—And How to Fix It (2019); Co-Author, The Writing Revolution: A Guide to Advancing Thinking Through Writing in All Subjects and Grades (2017)

Transforming Education: Critical Thinking in a Media Age

Daniel J. Levitin, PhD

Neuroscientist; Musician; Record Producer; Visiting Professor at Dartmouth CollegeStanford University and University of California, Berkeley; Founding Dean of Arts & Humanities, Minerva Schools at the Keck Graduate Institute, Claremont Colleges; James McGill Professor Emeritus of Psychology, Neuroscience, and Music at McGill University; Author, Successful Aging (2020), A Field Guide to Lies: Critical Thinking With Statistics and the Scientific Method (2019), The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload (2014), and This Is Your Brain On Music (2007)

Making Thinking Visible: A Look at Practice and Effect

Ron E. Ritchhart, EdD

Senior Research Associate, Harvard Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education, Harvard University; Author, Creating Cultures of Thinking: The 8 Forces We Must Master to Truly Transform Our Schools (2015) and Intellectual Character (2004); Co-Author, The Power of Making Thinking Visible: Using Routines to Engage and Empower Learners (2020) and Making Thinking Visible: How to Promote Engagement, Understanding, and Independence for All Learners (2011)

The Unlearning Cycle: Changing Teacher Mindsets to Create Expert Learners

Katie R. Novak, EdD

Founder, Executive Director, Education Consultant, Novak Educational Consulting; Adjunct Professor, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania; Author, Let Them Thrive (2017), UDL Now!: A Teacher's Guide to Applying Universal Design for Learning in Today's Classrooms (2016, 2nd edition); Co-Author, UDL Playbook for School and District Leaders (2021), UDL and Blended Learning (2021), Unlearning: Changing Your Beliefs amd Your Classroom With UDL (2020), and Innovate Inside the Box (2019)

Why Students Need to Outsmart Their Brains to Succeed at School

Daniel T. Willingham, PhD

Psychologist; Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Virginia; Member, National Board for Education Sciences; Writer, “Ask the Cognitive Scientist” Column, American Educator; Author, Outsmart Your Brain: Why Learning is Hard and How You Can Make It Easy (Forthcoming, 2022), “Unlocking the Science of How Kids Think: A New Proposal for Reforming Teacher Education” (2018, Education Next), “A Mental Model of the Learner: Teaching the Basic Science of Educational Psychology to Future Teachers” (2017, Mind, Brain, & Education), The Reading Mind: A Cognitive Approach to Understanding How the Mind Reads (2017), Raising Kids Who Read: What Parents and Teachers Can Do (2015), When Can You Trust the Experts? How to Tell Good Science from Bad in Education (2012), and Why Don’t Students Like School? (2010)

The Neurobiology of Learning to Learn: What We Think, We Become

André A. Fenton, PhD

Neuroscientist; Professor of Neural Science, New York University; Director, Fenton Lab, which studies how brains store experiences as memories, and how the expression of knowledge activates information that is relevant without activating what is irrelevant; Active Science Communicator and a Co-Host of "NOVA Wonders" on PBS; Host of the online lecture series, "Reconstructing Memory" Co-Founder, President and Chairman of the Board, Bio-Signal Group Corp; Associate Professor, SUNY Downstate Medical Center; Co-Author, "Cognitive Control Persistently Enhances Hippocampal Information Processing" (2021, Nature)

Solving the Frankenstein Problem: Why All Learning and Thinking Is Social, Emotional, Cultural, and Cognitive in the Brain

Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, EdD

Director, USC Center for Affective Neuroscience, Development, Learning, and Education (CANDLE); Professor of Education, USC Rossier School of Education; Professor of Psychology, Brain, and Creativity Institute; Faculty, Neuroscience Graduate Program, University of Southern California; Member of the Council of Distinguished Scientists at the National Commission on Social, Emotional, and Academic Development, Aspen Institute; Past President, IMBES (International Mind, Brain and Education Society); Recipient of the 2008 Transforming Education Through Neuroscience Award from Learning & the Brain Foundation and IMBES; Author, Emotions, Learning, and the Brain: Exploring the Educational Implications of Affective Neuroscience (2015); Co-Author, “Understanding Emotional Thought Can Transform Educators’ Understanding of How Students Learn” (2020, Educational Neuroscience), “Building Meaning Builds Teens’ Brains” (2020, Educational Leadership), "An Evolving Understanding of Social Emotions from a Mind, Brain, and Education Perspective" (2018, Research in Mind, Brain, and Education), and “The Brain Basis for Integrated Social, Emotional, and Academic Development” (2018, Aspen Institute)

Reflecting on Research: Being Curious, Skeptical, and Critical About Brain-Based Teaching Advice

Andrew C. Watson, MEd

Former Classroom Teacher; Founder/President of Translate the Brain, a professional development consultancy; Author, The Goldilocks Map: A Classroom Teacher’s Quest to Evaluate ‘Brain-Based’ Teaching Advice (2021), Learning Grows: The Science of Motivation for the Classroom Teacher (2019), and Learning Begins: A Teacher's Guide to the Learning Brain (2017); Blogger, Learning & the Brain Blog

1) THE SCIENCE OF BUILDING KNOWLEDGE: DEVELOPING EXPERT LEARNERS

The Neurobiology of Learning to Learn: What We Think, We Become

André A. Fenton, PhD

Neuroscientist; Professor of Neural Science, New York University; Director, Fenton Lab, which studies how brains store experiences as memories, and how the expression of knowledge activates information that is relevant without activating what is irrelevant; Active Science Communicator and a Co-Host of "NOVA Wonders" on PBS; Host of the online lecture series, "Reconstructing Memory" Co-Founder, President and Chairman of the Board, Bio-Signal Group Corp; Associate Professor, SUNY Downstate Medical Center; Co-Author, "Cognitive Control Persistently Enhances Hippocampal Information Processing" (2021, Nature)

The Unlearning Cycle: Changing Teacher Mindsets to Create Expert Learners

Katie R. Novak, EdD

Founder, Executive Director, Education Consultant, Novak Educational Consulting; Adjunct Professor, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania; Author, Let Them Thrive (2017), UDL Now!: A Teacher's Guide to Applying Universal Design for Learning in Today's Classrooms (2016, 2nd edition); Co-Author, UDL Playbook for School and District Leaders (2021), UDL and Blended Learning (2021), Unlearning: Changing Your Beliefs amd Your Classroom With UDL (2020), and Innovate Inside the Box (2019)

Why Students Need to Outsmart Their Brains to Succeed at School

Daniel T. Willingham, PhD

Psychologist; Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Virginia; Member, National Board for Education Sciences; Writer, “Ask the Cognitive Scientist” Column, American Educator; Author, Outsmart Your Brain: Why Learning is Hard and How You Can Make It Easy (Forthcoming, 2022), “Unlocking the Science of How Kids Think: A New Proposal for Reforming Teacher Education” (2018, Education Next), “A Mental Model of the Learner: Teaching the Basic Science of Educational Psychology to Future Teachers” (2017, Mind, Brain, & Education), The Reading Mind: A Cognitive Approach to Understanding How the Mind Reads (2017), Raising Kids Who Read: What Parents and Teachers Can Do (2015), When Can You Trust the Experts? How to Tell Good Science from Bad in Education (2012), and Why Don’t Students Like School? (2010)

The Building Blocks of Knowledge

Lila Davachi, PhD

Professor of Psychology; Director, Davachi Memory Lab, Columbia University; Co-Principal Investigator of the “Optimizing Memory Using Neural Information” Project; Recognized with the prestigious “Young Investigator Award” from the Cognitive Neuroscience Society in 2009; Co-Author, “Mnemonic Prediction Errors Promote Detailed Memories” (2021, PsyArXiv)

Better Learning: Becoming an Expert on Just About Anything

Ulrich J. Boser, BA

Founder, CEO, The Learning Agency & Learning Agency Lab; Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress; Author, “Critical Thinking Is the Key to Repairing Our Social Fabric” (2020, Psychology Today), Learn Better: Mastering the Skills for Success in Life, Business, and School, or How to Become an Expert in Just About Anything (2019), “Why Education Research Needs More Development” (2019), “Learning to Learn: Tips for Teens and Their Teachers” (2019, Educational Leadership); “What Do People Know About Excellent Teaching and Learning?” (2017); Co-Author, “Using the Science of Learning to Redesign Schools” (2018, Center for American Progress), “Learning Mindsets and Skills” (2017), and “Revisited: Do Schools Challenge Our Students?” (2017)

2) THE SCIENCE OF THINKING: TEACHING REASONING & CRITICAL THINKING

Rationality: What Is It, Why It Seems Scarce, and Why It Matters

Steven A. Pinker, PhD

Cognitive Psychologist; Johnstone Family Professor, Department of Psychology, Harvard University; Member, National Academy of Sciences; Named Time Magazine’s “100 Most Influential People in the World Today”; Author, Rationality: What It Is, Why It Seems Scarce, Why It Matters (2021), Enlightenment Now (2018), The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person’s Guide to Writing in the 21st Century (2014), Language, Cognition, and Human Nature (2013), The Stuff of Thought (2007), and How the Mind Works (1997)

Making Thinking Visible: A Look at Practice and Effect

Ron E. Ritchhart, EdD

Senior Research Associate, Harvard Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education, Harvard University; Author, Creating Cultures of Thinking: The 8 Forces We Must Master to Truly Transform Our Schools (2015) and Intellectual Character (2004); Co-Author, The Power of Making Thinking Visible: Using Routines to Engage and Empower Learners (2020) and Making Thinking Visible: How to Promote Engagement, Understanding, and Independence for All Learners (2011)

There Is No Learning Without Thinking

Derek A. Cabrera, PhD

Cognitive and Systems Thinking Scientist; Faculty, College of Human Ecology, Cornell University; Senior Scientist, Cabrera Research Lab; Research Fellow at the Santa Fe Institute (SFI) for the Study of Complex Systems and the National Science Foundation; Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Systems Thinking; Co-Author, Systems Thinking Made Simple (2018) and Thinking at Every Desk: Four Simple Skills to Transform Your Classroom (2012); Featured in the Documentary Film, “RE:Thinking” for his work in schools to teach thinking skills

How Does Education Hone Reasoning Ability?

Silvia A. Bunge, PhD

Professor, Department of Psychology, Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Berkeley; Member, National Scientific Council on the Developing Child; Founder, Frontiers of Innovation; Director, Building Blocks of Cognition Laboratory; Co-Author, "How Does Education Hone Reasoning Ability" (2020, Current Directions in Psychological Sciences); “Scientific Insights Into the Development of Analogical Reasoning” (2018, Developmental Science), "Fronto-Parietal Network Reconfiguration Supports the Development of Reasoning Ability" (2014), and "Intensive Reasoning Training Alters Patterns of Brain Connectivity at Rest" (2013)

How Multiple Choice Questions Can Improve Critical Thinking

Benjamin A. Motz, PhD

Cognitive Scientist, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences; Director, eLearning Research and Practice Lab, Indiana University; Co-Founder, Chief Research Officer, Boost; Researcher in memory and critical thinking; Co-Author, "Learning to Call Bullsh*t via Induction: Categorization Training Improves Critical Thinking Performance" (2021, PsyArXiv), "Generalizability, Transferability, and the Practice-to-Practice Gap" (2021, PsyArXiv), and “A Dissociation Between Engagement and Learning: Enthusiastic Instructions Fail to Reliably Improve Performance on a Memory Task” (2017, PLoS ONE)

Building Thinking Classrooms in Math

Peter G. Liljedahl, PhD

Professor of Mathematics Education, Simon Fraser University; President of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group and the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education; Member of the Executive of the British Columbia Mathematics Teachers Association; Author, Modifying Your Thinking Classroom for Different Settings (2021) and Building Thinking Classrooms in Mathematics (2020)

3) EMBODIED THOUGHT: HOW EMOTIONS & GESTURES HELP THINKING

Solving the Frankenstein Problem: Why All Learning and Thinking Is Social, Emotional, Cultural, and Cognitive in the Brain

Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, EdD

Director, USC Center for Affective Neuroscience, Development, Learning, and Education (CANDLE); Professor of Education, USC Rossier School of Education; Professor of Psychology, Brain, and Creativity Institute; Faculty, Neuroscience Graduate Program, University of Southern California; Member of the Council of Distinguished Scientists at the National Commission on Social, Emotional, and Academic Development, Aspen Institute; Past President, IMBES (International Mind, Brain and Education Society); Recipient of the 2008 Transforming Education Through Neuroscience Award from Learning & the Brain Foundation and IMBES; Author, Emotions, Learning, and the Brain: Exploring the Educational Implications of Affective Neuroscience (2015); Co-Author, “Understanding Emotional Thought Can Transform Educators’ Understanding of How Students Learn” (2020, Educational Neuroscience), “Building Meaning Builds Teens’ Brains” (2020, Educational Leadership), "An Evolving Understanding of Social Emotions from a Mind, Brain, and Education Perspective" (2018, Research in Mind, Brain, and Education), and “The Brain Basis for Integrated Social, Emotional, and Academic Development” (2018, Aspen Institute)

The Extended Mind: The Power of Thinking Outside Our Brains

Annie Murphy Paul, MS

Journalist; Writer; Fellow, Learning Sciences Exchange, New America, and The Jacobs Foundation; Served as Senior Advisor at the Poorvu Center for Teaching and Learning, Yale University; Awarded the Mental Health Journalism’s “Rosalynn Carter Fellowship”; Author, The Extended Mind: The Power of Thinking Outside the Brain (2021), "How Humans Think When They Think as Part of a Group" (2021, Wired), Origins (2011), and The Cult of Personality Testing (2005)

The Wisdom of the Body: What Embodied Cognition Can Teach Us About Thinking and Learning

Erik Shonstrom, MFA

Assistant Professor, Champlain College; Author, The Wisdom of the Body: What Embodied Cognition Can Teach Us About Learning, Human Development, and Ourselves (2020), The Indoor Epidemic (2017), Wild Curiosity: How to Unleash Creativity and Encourage Lifelong Wondering (2015), and “How Can Teachers Foster Curiosity?” (2014, Education Week)

Enhancing Learning With Gestures: Improving Math, Memory, and Transfer

Susan Wagner Cook, PhD

Associate Professor, Psychological and Brain Sciences, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, The University of Iowa; Director, Communications, Cognition, and Learning Lab; Co-Author, “Gesture During Math Instruction Specifically Benefits Learners With High Visuospatial Working Memory Capacity” (2020, Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications) and “Enhancing Learning With Hand Gestures: Potential Mechanisms” (2018, Psychology of Learning and Motivation)

4) KNOWING WORDS, STORIES, & FACTS: TEACHING READING & MEDIA LITERACY

The Story Paradox: How Stories Affect Our Brains, Bind Us Together, or Circumvent Rational Thought

Jonathan A. Gottschall, PhD

Distinguished Fellow, English Department, Washington & Jefferson College; Contributor, Psychology Today; Writer, The New York Times, Scientific American, The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Science, Nature and The Chronicle of Higher Education; Author, The Story Paradox: How Our Love for Storytelling Builds Societies and Tears Them Down (2021) and The Storytelling Animal (2015)

The Knowledge Gap: Why the Standard Approach to Reading Comprehension Conflicts With Cognitive Science

Natalie L. Wexler, JD

Education Writer; Senior Contributor, Forbes.com; Author, “Building Knowledge: What an Elementary Curriculum Should Do” (2020, American Educator) and The Knowledge Gap: The Hidden Cause of America's Broken Education System—And How to Fix It (2019); Co-Author, The Writing Revolution: A Guide to Advancing Thinking Through Writing in All Subjects and Grades (2017)

Transforming Education: Critical Thinking in a Media Age

Daniel J. Levitin, PhD

Neuroscientist; Musician; Record Producer; Visiting Professor at Dartmouth CollegeStanford University and University of California, Berkeley; Founding Dean of Arts & Humanities, Minerva Schools at the Keck Graduate Institute, Claremont Colleges; James McGill Professor Emeritus of Psychology, Neuroscience, and Music at McGill University; Author, Successful Aging (2020), A Field Guide to Lies: Critical Thinking With Statistics and the Scientific Method (2019), The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload (2014), and This Is Your Brain On Music (2007)

From Cortex to Classroom: Refining Professional Knowledge to Build Capacity in Reading Instruction

Carolyn H. Strom, PhD

Clinical Professor of Early Childhood Literacy, School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, New York University; Named one of “67 Influential Educators Who Are Changing the Way We Learn” by Noodle Education; Co-Author, “Seizing the Sounds: Considering Phonological Awareness in the Context of Vocabulary Instruction” (2016, Interventions in Learning Disabilities)

The Science of Reading: A Whirlwind Tour

Daniel T. Willingham, PhD

Psychologist; Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Virginia; Member, National Board for Education Sciences; Writer, “Ask the Cognitive Scientist” Column, American Educator; Author, Outsmart Your Brain: Why Learning is Hard and How You Can Make It Easy (Forthcoming, 2022), “Unlocking the Science of How Kids Think: A New Proposal for Reforming Teacher Education” (2018, Education Next), “A Mental Model of the Learner: Teaching the Basic Science of Educational Psychology to Future Teachers” (2017, Mind, Brain, & Education), The Reading Mind: A Cognitive Approach to Understanding How the Mind Reads (2017), Raising Kids Who Read: What Parents and Teachers Can Do (2015), When Can You Trust the Experts? How to Tell Good Science from Bad in Education (2012), and Why Don’t Students Like School? (2010)

Teaching Students to Decode the World: Media Literacy and Critical Thinking Across the Curriculum

Cyndy L. Scheibe, PhD

Professor, Department of Psychology; Faculty, Department of Culture and Communication, Ithaca College; Founder and Executive Director of Media Literacy, Project Look Sharp; Co-Author, Teaching Students to Decode the World: Media Literacy and Critical Thinking Across the Curriculum (Forthcoming, 2022) and The Teacher’s Guide to Media Literacy: Critical Thinking in a Multimedia World (2012)

Teaching Students to Decode the World: Media Literacy and Critical Thinking Across the Curriculum

Chris Sperry, MEd

Curriculum and Staff Development, Project Look Sharp, Ithaca College; Co-Author, Teaching Students to Decode the World: Media Literacy and Critical Thinking Across the Curriculum (Forthcoming, 2022)

5) REFLECTIVE MINDS: USING EXECUTIVE & METACOGNITION SKILLS

Reflecting on Research: Being Curious, Skeptical, and Critical About Brain-Based Teaching Advice

Andrew C. Watson, MEd

Former Classroom Teacher; Founder/President of Translate the Brain, a professional development consultancy; Author, The Goldilocks Map: A Classroom Teacher’s Quest to Evaluate ‘Brain-Based’ Teaching Advice (2021), Learning Grows: The Science of Motivation for the Classroom Teacher (2019), and Learning Begins: A Teacher's Guide to the Learning Brain (2017); Blogger, Learning & the Brain Blog

Metacognition, Reflection, and Curiosity

Janet Metcalfe, PhD

Director, Metacognition and Memory Lab; Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology; Director, Graduate Studies, Columbia University; Author, Metacogniion (2008); Co-Author, “The MAPS Model of Self-Regulation: Integrating Metacognition, Agency, and Possible Selves” (2021, Metacognition and Learning), “Epistemic Curiosity and the Region of Proximal Learning” (2020, Current Opinions in Behavioral Sciences),“Learning From One’s Own Errors and Those of Others” (2018, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review), and Metacognition (2014); Editor, Metacognition: A Special Issue of Personality and Social Psychology Review (2013), The Missing Link in Cognition (2005), and Metacognition: Knowing About Knowing (1996)

Metacognition: The Neglected Skill Set for Empowering Students

Robin J. Fogarty, PhD

President, Robin Fogarty & Associates; Former Teacher; Co-Author, Metacognition: The Neglected Skill Set for Empowering Students (2020), Thinking About Thinking in IB Schools (2020), How to Teach Thinking Skills (2019),Thinking About Thinking in IB Schools (2018), Metacognition (2018, Revised Edition), Everyday Problem-Based Learning: Quick Projects to Build Problem-Solving Fluency (2017), Unlocking Student Talent: The New Science of Developing Expertise (2017), The Right to be Literate (2015), Supporting Differentiated Instruction (2010), and Brain-Compatible Classroom (2009)

The Brain’s Command and Control Center: Understanding Executive Functioning

William R. Stixrud, PhD

Clinical Neuropsychologist, Founder, The Stixrud Group; Member, Teaching Faculty, Children’s National Medical Center; Assistant Professor, School of Medicine, George Washington University; Co-Author, What Do You Say?: How to Talk with Kids to Build Motivation, Stress Tolerance, and a Happy Home (2021) and The Self-Driven Child (2018)

Metacognition: The Neglected Skill Set for Empowering Students

Brian M. Pete, MA

President and Co-Founder, Robin Fogarty & Associates; Co-Author, Metacognition: The Neglected Skill Set for Empowering Students (2020), Thinking About Thinking in IB Schools (2020), How to Teach Thinking Skills (2019), Thinking About Thinking in IB Schools (2018), Metacognition (2018, Revised Edition), Everyday Problem-Based Learning: Quick Projects to Build Problem-Solving Fluency (2017), Unlocking Student Talent: The New Science of Developing Expertise (2017), The Right to be Literate (2015), Supporting Differentiated Instruction (2010), and Brain-Compatible Classroom (2009)

The Metacognitive Students: Teaching Emotionally Thriving Thinkers in Every Content Area

Richard K. Cohen, MA

Assistant Superintendent of Metuchen School District; Co-Adjunct Faculty, Rutgers University; Educational Consultant, Self-Q LLC; Co-Author, The Metacognitive Student: How to Teach Academic, Social, and Emotional Intelligence in Every Content Area (2021)

Think Smart: Mindsets, Metacognition, and Knowledge

Kathleen M. Kryza, MA

Master Teacher; CIO, Infinite Horizons; Co-Author, Transformative Teaching: Changing Today's Classrooms Culturally, Academically, and Emotionally (2015), Developing Growth Mindsets in the Inspiring Classroom (2011), Inspiring Elementary Learners (2008), Inspiring Middle and Secondary Learners (2007), and Differentiation for Real Classrooms (2009)

Think Smart: Mindsets, Metacognition, and Knowledge

Jack A. Naglieri, PhD

Research Professor, Curry School of Education, University of Virginia; Senior Research Scientist, Devereux Center for Resilient Children; Author, Helping Children Learn (2011, 2nd Edition); Co-Author, Interventions for Autism Spectrum Disorder: Translating Science to Practice (2017), The Handbook of Executive Functioning (2014), and “The School Neuropsychology of ADHD: Theory, Assessment, and Intervention” (2008, Psychology in the School)